Cultural Affiliation and Mammography Screening of Chinese Women in an Urban County of Michigan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160473
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Affiliation and Mammography Screening of Chinese Women in an Urban County of Michigan
Abstract:
Cultural Affiliation and Mammography Screening of Chinese Women in an Urban County of Michigan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Yu, Mei-yu
Contact Address:Room 3248, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Co-Authors:Tsu-Yin Wu; Darlene Mood
Cultural beliefs about health and disease prevention are important influences on women’s health behavior such as mammography screening. However, appropriate research instruments to measure the association between women's cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. Guided by culturally-specific adaptations made to the health belief model, a Chinese-English “Cultural Beliefs and Cancer Screening (CBCS)” questionnaire was developed. The CBCS questionnaire was first revised in English, translated into Chinese, validated through back translation, and pilot tested. The survey was conducted in an urban county of Michigan and generated a data set of 206 women of Chinese descent drawn from a consecutive sampling, one of the main nonprobability sampling designs. Data analysis tested the impact of women’s cultural affiliation measured by Mood’s (1996) Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS), needs for and access to mammography screening, and knowledge about breast cancer early detection on women’s mammography screening use. Compared with those who identified themselves as U.S. citizens (n=49), those who identified themselves as non-U.S. citizens (n=157) had a significantly stronger SCAS (p<.01) but had less access to health care (p<.01). Multiple regression analysis reports that when all other predictors were controlled statistically, cultural affiliation did not have a significant direct effect on mammography screening; however, it did have an indirect effect (â=-.51, p<.01) on mammography utilization mediated through access. Both need (â=.48, p<.01) and access (â=.48, p<.01) had direct effects on mammography use. Nevertheless, access is the strongest predictor. The model with the four independent variables explained 28.3% of variances of mammography utilization. Culturally and linguistically appropriate health promotion should be designed and implemented to improve women’s access to mammography screening. The strength of cultural affiliation needs to be considered to better understand Chinese women's breast cancer screening behavior. AN: MN030114
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Affiliation and Mammography Screening of Chinese Women in an Urban County of Michiganen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160473-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Affiliation and Mammography Screening of Chinese Women in an Urban County of Michigan </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Mei-yu</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Room 3248, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tsu-Yin Wu; Darlene Mood</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cultural beliefs about health and disease prevention are important influences on women&rsquo;s health behavior such as mammography screening. However, appropriate research instruments to measure the association between women's cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. Guided by culturally-specific adaptations made to the health belief model, a Chinese-English &ldquo;Cultural Beliefs and Cancer Screening (CBCS)&rdquo; questionnaire was developed. The CBCS questionnaire was first revised in English, translated into Chinese, validated through back translation, and pilot tested. The survey was conducted in an urban county of Michigan and generated a data set of 206 women of Chinese descent drawn from a consecutive sampling, one of the main nonprobability sampling designs. Data analysis tested the impact of women&rsquo;s cultural affiliation measured by Mood&rsquo;s (1996) Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS), needs for and access to mammography screening, and knowledge about breast cancer early detection on women&rsquo;s mammography screening use. Compared with those who identified themselves as U.S. citizens (n=49), those who identified themselves as non-U.S. citizens (n=157) had a significantly stronger SCAS (p&lt;.01) but had less access to health care (p&lt;.01). Multiple regression analysis reports that when all other predictors were controlled statistically, cultural affiliation did not have a significant direct effect on mammography screening; however, it did have an indirect effect (&acirc;=-.51, p&lt;.01) on mammography utilization mediated through access. Both need (&acirc;=.48, p&lt;.01) and access (&acirc;=.48, p&lt;.01) had direct effects on mammography use. Nevertheless, access is the strongest predictor. The model with the four independent variables explained 28.3% of variances of mammography utilization. Culturally and linguistically appropriate health promotion should be designed and implemented to improve women&rsquo;s access to mammography screening. The strength of cultural affiliation needs to be considered to better understand Chinese women's breast cancer screening behavior. AN: MN030114 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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