2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diversional Activities: Promoting and Preserving Cognitive Functioning in Elders
Abstract:
Diversional Activities: Promoting and Preserving Cognitive Functioning in Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Karen Krafcik; Sunida Preechawong; ChaeWeon Chung; Carol Musil; Beverly L. Roberts; Diana L. Morris
Within the next decade, the increasing number of elders and projected differences in their sociodemographic characteristics, including healthier functioning, extended retirement, and higher education, will affect planning for diversional activity programs for seniors. Since significant cognitive changes may develop with age, innovative therapeutic recreation for elders should focus on promoting and preserving their cognitive function. Albert's theory suggests that declines in cognition associated with aging involve five areas: attention, language, memory, visual / spatial ability, and conceptualization. However, the effects of engaging elders in diversional activities focusing on these five areas are unknown. An NINR-funded clinical trial, currently in progress, is examining the beneficial effects of an innovative diversional activity program focusing on promoting and preserving cognitive function in comparison with health teaching, coping skills, and reminiscence groups for elders in retirement communities (RCs). Using a pre-test-posttest design with repeated measures, 56 elders from six randomly selected Northeast Ohio RCs are participating in six weekly two-hour small group diversional activity sessions, which are facilitated by a gero-psychiatric nurse clinician. Specific activities constituting the program include word games, recognition and matching exercises, rebus puzzles, and other activities that address the five areas of cognitive functioning. Face-to-face data collection interviews were conducted before and three times after completing the diversional activity program. Although this program was originally conceived as a means for controlling for the effects of group process present in the health teaching, coping skills, and reminiscence groups, evidence for the clinical usefulness and effects of diversional activities in comparison with the other groups on measures of psychosocial health and physical functioning need to be determined. Knowledge gained from the testing and evaluation of this program will provide direction for further development of diversional activities used to stimulate cognitive functioning in elders experiencing memory loss. AN: MN030132
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiversional Activities: Promoting and Preserving Cognitive Functioning in Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diversional Activities: Promoting and Preserving Cognitive Functioning in Elders </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Krafcik; Sunida Preechawong; ChaeWeon Chung; Carol Musil; Beverly L. Roberts; Diana L. Morris</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Within the next decade, the increasing number of elders and projected differences in their sociodemographic characteristics, including healthier functioning, extended retirement, and higher education, will affect planning for diversional activity programs for seniors. Since significant cognitive changes may develop with age, innovative therapeutic recreation for elders should focus on promoting and preserving their cognitive function. Albert's theory suggests that declines in cognition associated with aging involve five areas: attention, language, memory, visual / spatial ability, and conceptualization. However, the effects of engaging elders in diversional activities focusing on these five areas are unknown. An NINR-funded clinical trial, currently in progress, is examining the beneficial effects of an innovative diversional activity program focusing on promoting and preserving cognitive function in comparison with health teaching, coping skills, and reminiscence groups for elders in retirement communities (RCs). Using a pre-test-posttest design with repeated measures, 56 elders from six randomly selected Northeast Ohio RCs are participating in six weekly two-hour small group diversional activity sessions, which are facilitated by a gero-psychiatric nurse clinician. Specific activities constituting the program include word games, recognition and matching exercises, rebus puzzles, and other activities that address the five areas of cognitive functioning. Face-to-face data collection interviews were conducted before and three times after completing the diversional activity program. Although this program was originally conceived as a means for controlling for the effects of group process present in the health teaching, coping skills, and reminiscence groups, evidence for the clinical usefulness and effects of diversional activities in comparison with the other groups on measures of psychosocial health and physical functioning need to be determined. Knowledge gained from the testing and evaluation of this program will provide direction for further development of diversional activities used to stimulate cognitive functioning in elders experiencing memory loss. AN: MN030132</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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