2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160476
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relaxation and Music Reduce pain after Abdominal Surgery in Older Adults
Abstract:
Relaxation and Music Reduce pain after Abdominal Surgery in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Al-Dgheim, Riyad, RN, MSN
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Marion Good, PhD ,RN, Associate Professor; Xiaomei Cong, MSN, RN, PhD Student
The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the effect of jaw relaxation, music and the combination of relaxation and music on pain following abdominal surgery in older adults between the ages of 50-70 . The study is based on the Good and Moore theory that nonpharmacological interventions in addition to analgesic medication reduce pain. Included were162 older adults (75% female), ranging in age from 50-70 years. These were part of a large sample of 500 adults in four hospitals in a large Midwestern city. An experimental pretest-post-test design was used to test the effect of interventions at both ambulation and rest on postoperative days one and two. Subjects were randomly assigned into a control group or three treatment groups (relaxation, music, or the combination) as well as to one of the two testing sequences (ambulation then rest; or rest then ambulation). Pain sensation and distress were measured with VAS scales at four points during ambulation (before preparation, after preparation, after ambulation, and after recovery) and before and after 15 minutes of rest. MANCOVA indicated that the three intervention groups together had significantly less pain than the control during rest, p=.020, day one and p=.004 day two, also they had less pain after preparation for ambulation on day one, p=.009, and day two p=.001, and after recovery from ambulation on day two, p=.037, but not immediately after ambulation on either day. Nurses can use relaxation and music to relieve sensation and distress of pain during ambulation and rest for older adult patients after abdominal surgery in both days. Supported by a NINR, Grant RO1#03933 (1994-1998), to Marion Good.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelaxation and Music Reduce pain after Abdominal Surgery in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160476-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relaxation and Music Reduce pain after Abdominal Surgery in Older Adults </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Al-Dgheim, Riyad, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Good, PhD ,RN, Associate Professor; Xiaomei Cong, MSN, RN, PhD Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the effect of jaw relaxation, music and the combination of relaxation and music on pain following abdominal surgery in older adults between the ages of 50-70 . The study is based on the Good and Moore theory that nonpharmacological interventions in addition to analgesic medication reduce pain. Included were162 older adults (75% female), ranging in age from 50-70 years. These were part of a large sample of 500 adults in four hospitals in a large Midwestern city. An experimental pretest-post-test design was used to test the effect of interventions at both ambulation and rest on postoperative days one and two. Subjects were randomly assigned into a control group or three treatment groups (relaxation, music, or the combination) as well as to one of the two testing sequences (ambulation then rest; or rest then ambulation). Pain sensation and distress were measured with VAS scales at four points during ambulation (before preparation, after preparation, after ambulation, and after recovery) and before and after 15 minutes of rest. MANCOVA indicated that the three intervention groups together had significantly less pain than the control during rest, p=.020, day one and p=.004 day two, also they had less pain after preparation for ambulation on day one, p=.009, and day two p=.001, and after recovery from ambulation on day two, p=.037, but not immediately after ambulation on either day. Nurses can use relaxation and music to relieve sensation and distress of pain during ambulation and rest for older adult patients after abdominal surgery in both days. Supported by a NINR, Grant RO1#03933 (1994-1998), to Marion Good.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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