2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Managed Blood Pressure Telemonitoring with African Americans
Abstract:
Nurse Managed Blood Pressure Telemonitoring with African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Olivia Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC, RN; Flack John, MD, MPH; Kai-Lin Cathy Jen, PhD; Jillon Vander Wall
High blood pressure (BP) control rates in African Americans, in comparison to Caucasians, have not improved between 1988 and 2000; thus, innovative strategies to improve BP control in this high-risk group are clearly needed. Home BP telemonitoring is one such strategy in which patients participate in their care. Additional research is necessary to determine the effects of this strategy on long-term BP control and to identify the mechanisms by which telemonitoring influences BP. Accordingly, the specific aims of this randomized controlled trial are: a) to compare usual care only with home telemonitoring plus usual care to determine which has the greatest effect on change in BP from baseline; and b) to examine why the intervention works to control BP by examining selected mediators, i.e., dietary habits, physical activity level, weight loss, reduced alcohol intake, compliance and/or persistence with an antihypertensive medication regimen, and contact with a primary care provider. Thus far 230 participants have been recruited using a community-based recruitment strategy. Otherwise healthy African American English speaking men and women who are greater than 18 years, have uncontrolled hypertension, and own or rent a home are being asked to participate. Participants are randomly assigned to one of two groups that are stratified by use or non-use of antihypertension medication: Group A, home telemonitoring plus usual care, or Group B, usual care only. Participants in Group A receive usual care plus 18 sessions of weekly telemonitoring and feedback combined with lifestyle modification telecounseling. Data (change in blood pressure from baseline, change in dietary habits, physical activity level, weight loss, alcohol intake, compliance with an antihypertensive medication regimen, and contact with a primary care provider) are being collected at baseline and at 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will include a general mixed linear model approach to repeated measures MANOVA and structural equation growth modeling. Issues related to conducting a telemonitoring research study will also be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Managed Blood Pressure Telemonitoring with African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Managed Blood Pressure Telemonitoring with African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Olivia Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC, RN; Flack John, MD, MPH; Kai-Lin Cathy Jen, PhD; Jillon Vander Wall</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">High blood pressure (BP) control rates in African Americans, in comparison to Caucasians, have not improved between 1988 and 2000; thus, innovative strategies to improve BP control in this high-risk group are clearly needed. Home BP telemonitoring is one such strategy in which patients participate in their care. Additional research is necessary to determine the effects of this strategy on long-term BP control and to identify the mechanisms by which telemonitoring influences BP. Accordingly, the specific aims of this randomized controlled trial are: a) to compare usual care only with home telemonitoring plus usual care to determine which has the greatest effect on change in BP from baseline; and b) to examine why the intervention works to control BP by examining selected mediators, i.e., dietary habits, physical activity level, weight loss, reduced alcohol intake, compliance and/or persistence with an antihypertensive medication regimen, and contact with a primary care provider. Thus far 230 participants have been recruited using a community-based recruitment strategy. Otherwise healthy African American English speaking men and women who are greater than 18 years, have uncontrolled hypertension, and own or rent a home are being asked to participate. Participants are randomly assigned to one of two groups that are stratified by use or non-use of antihypertension medication: Group A, home telemonitoring plus usual care, or Group B, usual care only. Participants in Group A receive usual care plus 18 sessions of weekly telemonitoring and feedback combined with lifestyle modification telecounseling. Data (change in blood pressure from baseline, change in dietary habits, physical activity level, weight loss, alcohol intake, compliance with an antihypertensive medication regimen, and contact with a primary care provider) are being collected at baseline and at 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will include a general mixed linear model approach to repeated measures MANOVA and structural equation growth modeling. Issues related to conducting a telemonitoring research study will also be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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