2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160482
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teenage mothers 12 years later: Creating a future or repeating the past?
Abstract:
Teenage mothers 12 years later: Creating a future or repeating the past?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Battle, Lee, RN, DNSc
Title:Professor
Contact Address:3525 Caroline St, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
In spite of the vast research on teenage mothers, there are few studies that chart their lives over time and even fewer that are designed to elicit the perspectives of teen mothers and family members. The longitudinal study reported here consists of a series of studies which have followed teenage mothers and their families for 12 years. The purpose of this longitudinal research is to explore how teen mothers experience the self and future and the meaning of mothering, coping, and caregiving over time from a multigenerational, interpretive perspective. All studies in the series have been based on the phenomenology of everyday practices and assume a dialogical view of the self. Sixteen families were first interviewed intensively in 1988-1989 once the teen's infant reached 8 - 10 months of age; they were reinterviewed in 1993, 1997, and 2001 (Time 4). Families were diverse with respect to race, socioeconomic status, and household composition. Eleven families participated at Time 4; the total sample (n=27) included 9 mothers, 3 of the women's partners, 9 maternal grandparents (of the teen's first-born child), and 6 children. Mothers ranged in age from 27 to 31 years and children were 12-13 years of age. Six in-depth interviews elicited the perspectives of study participants. Narrative data were analyzed using interpretive strategies. The views of these mothers challenge normative views of the life course and common stereotypes of teen mothers. While becoming pregnant as a teenager was rarely planned, mothering provided a compelling reason for planning the future. This paper will describe how parenting over the 12-year period provided a narrative scaffold for structuring and organizing these women's lives. Implications of the findings for public policy and nursing practice will be described.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeenage mothers 12 years later: Creating a future or repeating the past?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160482-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teenage mothers 12 years later: Creating a future or repeating the past? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Battle, Lee, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline St, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In spite of the vast research on teenage mothers, there are few studies that chart their lives over time and even fewer that are designed to elicit the perspectives of teen mothers and family members. The longitudinal study reported here consists of a series of studies which have followed teenage mothers and their families for 12 years. The purpose of this longitudinal research is to explore how teen mothers experience the self and future and the meaning of mothering, coping, and caregiving over time from a multigenerational, interpretive perspective. All studies in the series have been based on the phenomenology of everyday practices and assume a dialogical view of the self. Sixteen families were first interviewed intensively in 1988-1989 once the teen's infant reached 8 - 10 months of age; they were reinterviewed in 1993, 1997, and 2001 (Time 4). Families were diverse with respect to race, socioeconomic status, and household composition. Eleven families participated at Time 4; the total sample (n=27) included 9 mothers, 3 of the women's partners, 9 maternal grandparents (of the teen's first-born child), and 6 children. Mothers ranged in age from 27 to 31 years and children were 12-13 years of age. Six in-depth interviews elicited the perspectives of study participants. Narrative data were analyzed using interpretive strategies. The views of these mothers challenge normative views of the life course and common stereotypes of teen mothers. While becoming pregnant as a teenager was rarely planned, mothering provided a compelling reason for planning the future. This paper will describe how parenting over the 12-year period provided a narrative scaffold for structuring and organizing these women's lives. Implications of the findings for public policy and nursing practice will be described. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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