2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160483
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Needs of Caregivers of Older Adults: Cultural Influences
Abstract:
Perceived Needs of Caregivers of Older Adults: Cultural Influences
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Belt-Marchesi, June, MSN, ARNP
Title:Senior Research Associate
Contact Address:Landon Center on Aging, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Co-Authors:Lorie G. Richards, PhD, OTR, Health Scientist; Veronica Rempusheski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Linda Redford, PhD, RN
The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of caregiving for an older adult across three cultures (African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian) to determine similarities and differences, to discover what caregivers perceived needs or problems were, what self identified solutions they had, and whether cultural variance existed in these areas as well. A total of 13 caregivers were recruited (6 African American, 3 Hispanic, 4 Caucasian) to participate in two culturally homogenous focus group interviews. Of these, 6 were adult daughters, 6 were female spouses, and 1 was an adult nephew to the care recipient. Heterogeneity in care recipient disability level was present both within and across cultural groups. Qualitative data analysis, including a cross cultural theme comparison occurred simultaneously with data collection. Four categories of concern (preparation and obligation, day to day coping, experiences with formal and informal assistance, and identified needs and desired solutions) emerged from data content analysis, as well as 10 themes. Similarities between ethnic groups included performing activities aimed at preservation of care recipient integrity/safety; sensing a lack of time; experiencing anger and grief; and coping through prayer, humor, patience and flexibility. Differences in preparation for the caregiving role were related to familial ties rather than ethnic background. Differences among ethnic groups related to familial obligation and support, identified stressors and needs, and the use of infant-child metaphors when describing caregiving experiences. As data were analyzed and themes emerged, it became apparent that the Theory of Culture Brokering (Jezewski, 1995) provided the best fit for understanding caregiver needs and proposing solutions cross-culturally. Recommendations include an examination of advocacy, respite, culture brokering, caregiver support, and future recruitment issues. Regardless of practice setting, the consideration of culturally influenced caregiver experience and preference is paramount to appropriate nursing intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Needs of Caregivers of Older Adults: Cultural Influencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160483-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Needs of Caregivers of Older Adults: Cultural Influences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belt-Marchesi, June, MSN, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Landon Center on Aging, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lorie G. Richards, PhD, OTR, Health Scientist; Veronica Rempusheski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Linda Redford, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of caregiving for an older adult across three cultures (African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian) to determine similarities and differences, to discover what caregivers perceived needs or problems were, what self identified solutions they had, and whether cultural variance existed in these areas as well. A total of 13 caregivers were recruited (6 African American, 3 Hispanic, 4 Caucasian) to participate in two culturally homogenous focus group interviews. Of these, 6 were adult daughters, 6 were female spouses, and 1 was an adult nephew to the care recipient. Heterogeneity in care recipient disability level was present both within and across cultural groups. Qualitative data analysis, including a cross cultural theme comparison occurred simultaneously with data collection. Four categories of concern (preparation and obligation, day to day coping, experiences with formal and informal assistance, and identified needs and desired solutions) emerged from data content analysis, as well as 10 themes. Similarities between ethnic groups included performing activities aimed at preservation of care recipient integrity/safety; sensing a lack of time; experiencing anger and grief; and coping through prayer, humor, patience and flexibility. Differences in preparation for the caregiving role were related to familial ties rather than ethnic background. Differences among ethnic groups related to familial obligation and support, identified stressors and needs, and the use of infant-child metaphors when describing caregiving experiences. As data were analyzed and themes emerged, it became apparent that the Theory of Culture Brokering (Jezewski, 1995) provided the best fit for understanding caregiver needs and proposing solutions cross-culturally. Recommendations include an examination of advocacy, respite, culture brokering, caregiver support, and future recruitment issues. Regardless of practice setting, the consideration of culturally influenced caregiver experience and preference is paramount to appropriate nursing intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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