Mining the Minimum Data Set (MDS): Measurement of Quality of Life Variables in Nursing Home Residents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160484
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mining the Minimum Data Set (MDS): Measurement of Quality of Life Variables in Nursing Home Residents
Abstract:
Mining the Minimum Data Set (MDS): Measurement of Quality of Life Variables in Nursing Home Residents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bergman-Evans, Brenda, PhD, APRN, BC
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Parsons, MSN, RN, Assistant Professor; Carla Abel-Zieg, MS, RN; Margaret Gound, MS, APRN, BC
The Eden Alternative model arose in response to an observation by its founder that in long-term care facilities, loneliness, helplessness, and boredom rage out of control and steadily decay the residents’ spirits and adversely affect quality of life (Thomas, 1996). This conceptual framework for nursing home care has certainly gained momentum, but little empirical evidence is available to support it. In part this is due to the problems of measurement of loneliness, helplessness and boredom in populations with a large percentage of cognitively impaired individuals. Most research instruments related to these concepts are designed for subjects who are cognitively intact. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to explore the reliability and feasibility of using MDS data to measure loneliness, helplessness, and boredom in nursing home residents. A subset of cognitively intact subjects from a study population of 242 older adults (190 females) from 2 study facilities was identified. From chart review investigators gathered objective data on MDS items consistent with loneliness (7 items), helplessness (9 items) and boredom (9 items). These subjects were then interviewed using the UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3), Lubben Social Network Scale, and study specific Helplessness and Boredom Profiles. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and correlations directed at determining relationships between the MDS and interview data on loneliness, helplessness and boredom. The MDS contains a wealth of data on all residents that is updated at regular intervals. Since at least half of the residents of nursing homes suffer from some cognitive problems, it is imperative that feasible evaluation measures be identified for quality of life interventions in this important but often forgotten population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMining the Minimum Data Set (MDS): Measurement of Quality of Life Variables in Nursing Home Residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160484-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mining the Minimum Data Set (MDS): Measurement of Quality of Life Variables in Nursing Home Residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bergman-Evans, Brenda, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Parsons, MSN, RN, Assistant Professor; Carla Abel-Zieg, MS, RN; Margaret Gound, MS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Eden Alternative model arose in response to an observation by its founder that in long-term care facilities, loneliness, helplessness, and boredom rage out of control and steadily decay the residents&rsquo; spirits and adversely affect quality of life (Thomas, 1996). This conceptual framework for nursing home care has certainly gained momentum, but little empirical evidence is available to support it. In part this is due to the problems of measurement of loneliness, helplessness and boredom in populations with a large percentage of cognitively impaired individuals. Most research instruments related to these concepts are designed for subjects who are cognitively intact. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to explore the reliability and feasibility of using MDS data to measure loneliness, helplessness, and boredom in nursing home residents. A subset of cognitively intact subjects from a study population of 242 older adults (190 females) from 2 study facilities was identified. From chart review investigators gathered objective data on MDS items consistent with loneliness (7 items), helplessness (9 items) and boredom (9 items). These subjects were then interviewed using the UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3), Lubben Social Network Scale, and study specific Helplessness and Boredom Profiles. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and correlations directed at determining relationships between the MDS and interview data on loneliness, helplessness and boredom. The MDS contains a wealth of data on all residents that is updated at regular intervals. Since at least half of the residents of nursing homes suffer from some cognitive problems, it is imperative that feasible evaluation measures be identified for quality of life interventions in this important but often forgotten population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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