Hypothesized Relationships of Components of Expertise in Emergency Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160485
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypothesized Relationships of Components of Expertise in Emergency Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Hypothesized Relationships of Components of Expertise in Emergency Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bobay, Kathleen, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, Clark Hall, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Purpose Although expertise has been discussed extensively in the nursing literature, there exists no clear definition of what nursing expertise is or how to measure it. As a result, it is difficult to identify clinical nursing experts or to know how to promote the development of expertise in those nurses with the ability and desire to become experts. Theoretical framework The model of clinical expertise in this study differed from the traditional nursing model (Benner, 1984) in several ways. It is not based on a continuum, but rather compares the differences between experienced nonexpert and expert nurses. Key variables explored included progressive problem solving, domain-specific knowledge, experience, quest for excellence, reinvestment, and complex reflective thinking. Subjects Mail surveys were sent to 1000 nurses who had taken the Certification for Emergency Nursing (CEN) examination within the previous calendar year. A total of 338 (34%) of surveys were returned. Methods Data analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling (SEM) and t-tests. Results Key findings showed that experience and progressive problem solving were poor predictors of expertise, although these are the two most frequently used proxies of expertise used in previous studies. Reinvestment, continuous lifelong learning, was shown to have a significant effect on the development of complex reflective thinking (CRT). Conclusions Experience and problem solving should not be used as proxies for expertise. The concepts of reinvestment, complex reflective thinking, and quest for excellence have not been explored extensively in the nursing literature and deserve more attention. Further research should include exploring other instruments that might better measure the concepts and testing on different nursing populations. This research was supported by a grant from the American Nurses Credentialing Center IREC Margretta Madden Styles Credentialing Dissertation Award.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypothesized Relationships of Components of Expertise in Emergency Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160485-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypothesized Relationships of Components of Expertise in Emergency Nursing Practice </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bobay, Kathleen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Clark Hall, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose Although expertise has been discussed extensively in the nursing literature, there exists no clear definition of what nursing expertise is or how to measure it. As a result, it is difficult to identify clinical nursing experts or to know how to promote the development of expertise in those nurses with the ability and desire to become experts. Theoretical framework The model of clinical expertise in this study differed from the traditional nursing model (Benner, 1984) in several ways. It is not based on a continuum, but rather compares the differences between experienced nonexpert and expert nurses. Key variables explored included progressive problem solving, domain-specific knowledge, experience, quest for excellence, reinvestment, and complex reflective thinking. Subjects Mail surveys were sent to 1000 nurses who had taken the Certification for Emergency Nursing (CEN) examination within the previous calendar year. A total of 338 (34%) of surveys were returned. Methods Data analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling (SEM) and t-tests. Results Key findings showed that experience and progressive problem solving were poor predictors of expertise, although these are the two most frequently used proxies of expertise used in previous studies. Reinvestment, continuous lifelong learning, was shown to have a significant effect on the development of complex reflective thinking (CRT). Conclusions Experience and problem solving should not be used as proxies for expertise. The concepts of reinvestment, complex reflective thinking, and quest for excellence have not been explored extensively in the nursing literature and deserve more attention. Further research should include exploring other instruments that might better measure the concepts and testing on different nursing populations. This research was supported by a grant from the American Nurses Credentialing Center IREC Margretta Madden Styles Credentialing Dissertation Award.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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