2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Fatigue Among Persons with Chronic Rheumatic Disease
Abstract:
Patterns of Fatigue Among Persons with Chronic Rheumatic Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Brauer, Donna, PhD, MS, BS, BSN, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:14419 Waco St, Ramsey, MN, 55303, USA
Co-Authors:Dorothy Van Buskirk, MS, BSN, RN; Carol Droegemueller, MS, BSN, RN, CS, Clinical Specialist
Acute fatigue has been extensively studied, but fatigue associated with chronic disease has not. While the cause of chronic fatigue is unknown, pain, sleep disturbance, depression, exercise, anxiety, and stressors are known to influence fatigue's impact on self-care ability and quality of life. Interventions to modify fatigue experience demonstrate only minimal effects. It is unknown if personal characteristics influence the fatigue experience or if fatigue is experienced uniformly across persons with the same chronic disease. This study was designed to describe the fatigue experience and examine the relationships of temperamental dispositions and demographic characteristics to that experience. Two research questions were asked: 1) how is fatigue described and 2) what is the relationship between temperamental dispositions and fatigue experience? The Integrated Fatigue Model served as the conceptual framework for the study. The design was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal database of symptoms and self-care responses of persons with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus. The original data were collected during the first author's NIH-funded study of symptom management by persons with chronic rheumatic conditions. Participants completed a semi-structured health-diary describing all symptoms experienced and responses to those symptoms for three consecutive weeks. They also completed a demographic form and a personality inventory. For this study, the sample consisted of all records that contained at least one report of fatigue during a 2-week period (n=134). Data analysis consisted of descriptive and inferential statistics conducted on the entire sample and on subgroups. The findings revealed 3 patterns of fatigue experience. Statistically significant differences in symptom interpretation and in self-care responses were found among the patterns. Significant relationships among temperamental dispositions, fatigue pattern, and fatigue interpretation were also found. The findings support Piper's multidimensional model and suggest that temperament and symptom interpretation must be considered when selecting interventions to modify fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Fatigue Among Persons with Chronic Rheumatic Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Fatigue Among Persons with Chronic Rheumatic Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brauer, Donna, PhD, MS, BS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14419 Waco St, Ramsey, MN, 55303, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dorothy Van Buskirk, MS, BSN, RN; Carol Droegemueller, MS, BSN, RN, CS, Clinical Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Acute fatigue has been extensively studied, but fatigue associated with chronic disease has not. While the cause of chronic fatigue is unknown, pain, sleep disturbance, depression, exercise, anxiety, and stressors are known to influence fatigue's impact on self-care ability and quality of life. Interventions to modify fatigue experience demonstrate only minimal effects. It is unknown if personal characteristics influence the fatigue experience or if fatigue is experienced uniformly across persons with the same chronic disease. This study was designed to describe the fatigue experience and examine the relationships of temperamental dispositions and demographic characteristics to that experience. Two research questions were asked: 1) how is fatigue described and 2) what is the relationship between temperamental dispositions and fatigue experience? The Integrated Fatigue Model served as the conceptual framework for the study. The design was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal database of symptoms and self-care responses of persons with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus. The original data were collected during the first author's NIH-funded study of symptom management by persons with chronic rheumatic conditions. Participants completed a semi-structured health-diary describing all symptoms experienced and responses to those symptoms for three consecutive weeks. They also completed a demographic form and a personality inventory. For this study, the sample consisted of all records that contained at least one report of fatigue during a 2-week period (n=134). Data analysis consisted of descriptive and inferential statistics conducted on the entire sample and on subgroups. The findings revealed 3 patterns of fatigue experience. Statistically significant differences in symptom interpretation and in self-care responses were found among the patterns. Significant relationships among temperamental dispositions, fatigue pattern, and fatigue interpretation were also found. The findings support Piper's multidimensional model and suggest that temperament and symptom interpretation must be considered when selecting interventions to modify fatigue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.