2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160487
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Utilization of Complementary Therapies
Abstract:
Adolescent Utilization of Complementary Therapies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Braun, Carie, PhD, RN, CNP
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 37 College Avenue South, St. Joseph, MN, 56374, USA
The purpose of this study was to examine alternative/complementary therapy utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional self-report survey of a convenience sample of 401 adolescents, ages 12-18, was conducted. Analyses described demographic information, overall proportions of A/CT use, reasons/barriers to use, influences on use, desired health outcomes, perceived treatment efficacy, insurance payment and out-of-pocket costs, and disclosure of A/CT use to health care providers. Logistic regression procedures were applied to evaluate the bivariate associations of age, gender, race/ethnicity, health rating, employment status, health conditions, medications taken, and health responsibility with overall and select A/CT use or non-use. Statistically significant bivariate associations were then entered into a multivariate logistic regression. Results: Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reportedly used one or more A/CT; the most commonly used therapies were herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). A primary reason for use was that family/friends also used the therapy; the greatest barrier to A/CT use was lack of familiarity (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome and few (13.8%) disclosed use to their health care providers. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate procedures; while in the multivariate model, associations of race/ethnicity and health responsibility and A/CT use were statistically significant. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents with very few disclosing A/CT use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to provide a more complete understanding of adolescent health practices. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use as well as to further explore the associations between ethnicity and A/CT use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Utilization of Complementary Therapiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160487-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Utilization of Complementary Therapies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Braun, Carie, PhD, RN, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 37 College Avenue South, St. Joseph, MN, 56374, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine alternative/complementary therapy utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional self-report survey of a convenience sample of 401 adolescents, ages 12-18, was conducted. Analyses described demographic information, overall proportions of A/CT use, reasons/barriers to use, influences on use, desired health outcomes, perceived treatment efficacy, insurance payment and out-of-pocket costs, and disclosure of A/CT use to health care providers. Logistic regression procedures were applied to evaluate the bivariate associations of age, gender, race/ethnicity, health rating, employment status, health conditions, medications taken, and health responsibility with overall and select A/CT use or non-use. Statistically significant bivariate associations were then entered into a multivariate logistic regression. Results: Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reportedly used one or more A/CT; the most commonly used therapies were herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). A primary reason for use was that family/friends also used the therapy; the greatest barrier to A/CT use was lack of familiarity (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome and few (13.8%) disclosed use to their health care providers. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate procedures; while in the multivariate model, associations of race/ethnicity and health responsibility and A/CT use were statistically significant. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents with very few disclosing A/CT use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to provide a more complete understanding of adolescent health practices. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use as well as to further explore the associations between ethnicity and A/CT use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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