Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160490
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping
Abstract:
Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Brumitt, Gail, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Merrill-Palmer Institute
Title:Associate Director/Research Associate
Contact Address:, 71 East Ferry, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Edythe S. Hough, EdD, RN; Thomas N. Templin, PhD
Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping Brief Problem Statement: What are the relations among disease progression in HIV-positive mothers and the social support, coping and behavioral adjustment of their uninfected children? Conceptual Framework: Using a stress/coping framework, the effect of maternal HIV-related stress on the coping of the uninfected child was examined. Sample/Design: HIV+ mothers (N=147) and their uninfected children, recruited from community agencies in metropolitan Detroit, were interviewed individually. The children completed standardized measures of social support, coping and emotional/behavioral adjustment. The mother’s HIV status was assessed using the HIV Assessment Tool (symptom severity), presence of HIV-related opportunistic infections, and t-cell count. Maternal HIV status was dichotomized (asymptomatic vs. symptomatic/AIDS). Analysis: Data for each group were analyzed in separate structural equation models. Results: Both models had a good fit to the data (comparative fit index=1.00, root mean square estimate of error=.00, for both). Among asymptomatic mothers, child social support was significantly related to child coping and to child behavioral adjustment. Among mothers with symptoms or AIDS three significant paths were revealed: child social support to child coping, child social support to child behavioral adjustment, and child coping to child behavioral adjustment. Conclusion: These data indicate a differential relationship between child coping and child behavioral adjustment, suggesting the increased importance of child coping as the mother’s health declines. In both groups, child coping is related to the child’s available social support, confirming the need for child-focused interventions that facilitate the development of supportive social networks and effective coping strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Copingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160490-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brumitt, Gail, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Merrill-Palmer Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Director/Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 71 East Ferry, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Edythe S. Hough, EdD, RN; Thomas N. Templin, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Effect of Maternal HIV Status on Child Behavior: The Role of Child Social Support and Coping Brief Problem Statement: What are the relations among disease progression in HIV-positive mothers and the social support, coping and behavioral adjustment of their uninfected children? Conceptual Framework: Using a stress/coping framework, the effect of maternal HIV-related stress on the coping of the uninfected child was examined. Sample/Design: HIV+ mothers (N=147) and their uninfected children, recruited from community agencies in metropolitan Detroit, were interviewed individually. The children completed standardized measures of social support, coping and emotional/behavioral adjustment. The mother&rsquo;s HIV status was assessed using the HIV Assessment Tool (symptom severity), presence of HIV-related opportunistic infections, and t-cell count. Maternal HIV status was dichotomized (asymptomatic vs. symptomatic/AIDS). Analysis: Data for each group were analyzed in separate structural equation models. Results: Both models had a good fit to the data (comparative fit index=1.00, root mean square estimate of error=.00, for both). Among asymptomatic mothers, child social support was significantly related to child coping and to child behavioral adjustment. Among mothers with symptoms or AIDS three significant paths were revealed: child social support to child coping, child social support to child behavioral adjustment, and child coping to child behavioral adjustment. Conclusion: These data indicate a differential relationship between child coping and child behavioral adjustment, suggesting the increased importance of child coping as the mother&rsquo;s health declines. In both groups, child coping is related to the child&rsquo;s available social support, confirming the need for child-focused interventions that facilitate the development of supportive social networks and effective coping strategies. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.