Bodily Knowledge in Persons with Inflammatory Bowel Disease AU: Jeri Lou Burger, PhD(c), RN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160491
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bodily Knowledge in Persons with Inflammatory Bowel Disease AU: Jeri Lou Burger, PhD(c), RN
Abstract:
Bodily Knowledge in Persons with Inflammatory Bowel Disease AU: Jeri Lou Burger, PhD(c), RN
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Burger, Jeri, RN
Contact Address:SON, 1621 N. Thomas Ave, Evansville, IN, 47711, USA
The purpose of this interpretive study is to understand the experience of living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on a day-to-day basis. The effect the illness has on the person’s life, the person’s understanding of the illness, and the person’s response to symptoms are being investigated. These findings can help nurses assist clients who are struggling to adjust to the difficulties presented by IBD. Interpretive phenomenology and scholarship on embodiment provides the philosophical background for the study. A convenience sample included 8 adults, four women and two men diagnosed with Crohn’s disease and two women diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. All participants had been diagnosed for at least one year. Participants ranged in age from 30 to 65 with a mean age of 50. Data collection consisted of four semi-structured interviews with each participant over a 4-6 month period. The first interview elicited the participant’s understanding of the illness. In the subsequent interviews, participants were asked to describe difficult and meaningful situations in dealing with the illness and related symptoms. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis is in progress and includes the interpretive strategies of thematic, paradigm, and exemplar analysis. Preliminary analysis highlights the development of bodily knowledge and distinct patterns in the person’s relationship to the illness. In some cases, the pattern of symptoms is so well known, the person no longer views these symptoms as part of the illness, but rather as a normal part of the person’s life. Responses to the illness are automatic and incorporated into the person’s lifestyle. In other cases, the person is more aware of the pattern of symptoms and seeks out measures to control or alter the illness. These preliminary findings will be more fully explored as additional cases are analyzed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBodily Knowledge in Persons with Inflammatory Bowel Disease AU: Jeri Lou Burger, PhD(c), RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160491-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bodily Knowledge in Persons with Inflammatory Bowel Disease AU: Jeri Lou Burger, PhD(c), RN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burger, Jeri, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1621 N. Thomas Ave, Evansville, IN, 47711, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this interpretive study is to understand the experience of living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on a day-to-day basis. The effect the illness has on the person&rsquo;s life, the person&rsquo;s understanding of the illness, and the person&rsquo;s response to symptoms are being investigated. These findings can help nurses assist clients who are struggling to adjust to the difficulties presented by IBD. Interpretive phenomenology and scholarship on embodiment provides the philosophical background for the study. A convenience sample included 8 adults, four women and two men diagnosed with Crohn&rsquo;s disease and two women diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. All participants had been diagnosed for at least one year. Participants ranged in age from 30 to 65 with a mean age of 50. Data collection consisted of four semi-structured interviews with each participant over a 4-6 month period. The first interview elicited the participant&rsquo;s understanding of the illness. In the subsequent interviews, participants were asked to describe difficult and meaningful situations in dealing with the illness and related symptoms. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis is in progress and includes the interpretive strategies of thematic, paradigm, and exemplar analysis. Preliminary analysis highlights the development of bodily knowledge and distinct patterns in the person&rsquo;s relationship to the illness. In some cases, the pattern of symptoms is so well known, the person no longer views these symptoms as part of the illness, but rather as a normal part of the person&rsquo;s life. Responses to the illness are automatic and incorporated into the person&rsquo;s lifestyle. In other cases, the person is more aware of the pattern of symptoms and seeks out measures to control or alter the illness. These preliminary findings will be more fully explored as additional cases are analyzed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:59:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:59:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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