2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160504
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart rate variability: Theoretical and measurement issues
Abstract:
Heart rate variability: Theoretical and measurement issues
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:White, Jill, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall-Room 717, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5496
In the absence of any neurohumoral influences, normal intrinsic heart rate is approximately 100 to 120 beats per minute. With an intact, unblocked autonomic nervous system, heart rate provides a representation of the net effect of parasympathetic nervous system and sympathetic nervous system influences on the sinoatrial (SA) node. Under normal resting periods, heart rate is primarily controlled by vagal (parasympathetic) influences. As vagal outflow increases, greater cardiac interbeat variability is evident. Conversely, with increased sympathetic nervous system arousal, a reduction in cardiac variability occurs. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) produces indirect measures of cardiovascular responsiveness to alterations in autonomic nervous system reactivity. HRV measures provide quantification of modulations in heart periods, or R-R intervals, resulting from cyclical fluctuations in autonomic nervous system control of the SA node. That is, HRV analysis yields information about the variation from one cardiac cycle to the next. Distinct changes in heart rate are expected in response to physiological and mental stressors. Diminished HRV has been associated with such problems as myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and premature infants. Theoretical, measurement, and feasibility issues will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart rate variability: Theoretical and measurement issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160504-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart rate variability: Theoretical and measurement issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Jill, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall-Room 717, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5496</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jill@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the absence of any neurohumoral influences, normal intrinsic heart rate is approximately 100 to 120 beats per minute. With an intact, unblocked autonomic nervous system, heart rate provides a representation of the net effect of parasympathetic nervous system and sympathetic nervous system influences on the sinoatrial (SA) node. Under normal resting periods, heart rate is primarily controlled by vagal (parasympathetic) influences. As vagal outflow increases, greater cardiac interbeat variability is evident. Conversely, with increased sympathetic nervous system arousal, a reduction in cardiac variability occurs. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) produces indirect measures of cardiovascular responsiveness to alterations in autonomic nervous system reactivity. HRV measures provide quantification of modulations in heart periods, or R-R intervals, resulting from cyclical fluctuations in autonomic nervous system control of the SA node. That is, HRV analysis yields information about the variation from one cardiac cycle to the next. Distinct changes in heart rate are expected in response to physiological and mental stressors. Diminished HRV has been associated with such problems as myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and premature infants. Theoretical, measurement, and feasibility issues will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:00:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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