Factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior among Chinese women in an urban area of Michigan – A focus group approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160509
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior among Chinese women in an urban area of Michigan – A focus group approach
Abstract:
Factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior among Chinese women in an urban area of Michigan – A focus group approach
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Yu, Mei-yu, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Research Scientist
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2238, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.936.3590
The research aimed to study factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior of Chinese women in the United States. The Health Belief Model (Becker, 1977) provided the theoretical framework for the study. Three focus group meetings were conducted in early 2000 among a convenience sample of 23 Chinese women aged 40 and older residing in Michigan. Findings indicate that the factors affecting women's cancer screening included psychosocial and linguistic barriers as well as lack of health insurance. The women who believed cancer is always fatal were less likely to have regular mammography screening. Older women who believed that preventive care is a luxury did not want to bother their children for rides and/or interpreting. Sixty-five percent of the women felt it was stressful to visit English-speaking health clinics. Although all women believed that health is important, only 25% of those who were uninsured received mammograms in the past two years. Listening to women helped to understand the determinants of health behavior that are critical for the development of culturally sensitive interventions. Effective education/promotion is needed for not only women but also their families and the Chinese community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors affecting breast cancer screening behavior among Chinese women in an urban area of Michigan – A focus group approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160509-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior among Chinese women in an urban area of Michigan &ndash; A focus group approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Mei-yu, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2238, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.936.3590</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yujiang@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The research aimed to study factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior of Chinese women in the United States. The Health Belief Model (Becker, 1977) provided the theoretical framework for the study. Three focus group meetings were conducted in early 2000 among a convenience sample of 23 Chinese women aged 40 and older residing in Michigan. Findings indicate that the factors affecting women's cancer screening included psychosocial and linguistic barriers as well as lack of health insurance. The women who believed cancer is always fatal were less likely to have regular mammography screening. Older women who believed that preventive care is a luxury did not want to bother their children for rides and/or interpreting. Sixty-five percent of the women felt it was stressful to visit English-speaking health clinics. Although all women believed that health is important, only 25% of those who were uninsured received mammograms in the past two years. Listening to women helped to understand the determinants of health behavior that are critical for the development of culturally sensitive interventions. Effective education/promotion is needed for not only women but also their families and the Chinese community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:00:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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