Coping skills utilized by mothers combining breastfeeding and full-time employment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160510
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping skills utilized by mothers combining breastfeeding and full-time employment
Abstract:
Coping skills utilized by mothers combining breastfeeding and full-time employment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Caputo-Jones, Terri
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.3131
Problem: While there is an 80% attrition rate of mothers who attempt to combine breast-feeding and working, little is known about the coping skills utilized by women who successfully combine breast-feeding and working. Purpose: To identify the coping skills used by mothers to combine breast-feeding and full-time employment and to explore mother’s perceptions of situations that helped or hindered her ability to continue breast-feeding and working. Methods: Part of a descriptive-correlational study in which, a convenience sample of 24 mothers completed a survey, the Dual-Employed Coping Skills (DECS) and were asked to answer two open-ended questions; “What helped you the most to continue breast-feeding while working?” and “What has been the biggest barrier to combining breast-feeding and working?” Qualitative data obtained from the open-ended questions was analyzed using basic content analysis. Research Findings: Two primary themes were identified, “Help Themes,” such as support of friends and family, and “Barrier Themes,” such as time issues or pumping issues. Practice Implications: Nurses can use to educate mothers in how to combine breast-feeding and working, as well as what to expect from themselves, their infants, their workplaces, and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping skills utilized by mothers combining breastfeeding and full-time employmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160510-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping skills utilized by mothers combining breastfeeding and full-time employment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Caputo-Jones, Terri</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.3131</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: While there is an 80% attrition rate of mothers who attempt to combine breast-feeding and working, little is known about the coping skills utilized by women who successfully combine breast-feeding and working. Purpose: To identify the coping skills used by mothers to combine breast-feeding and full-time employment and to explore mother&rsquo;s perceptions of situations that helped or hindered her ability to continue breast-feeding and working. Methods: Part of a descriptive-correlational study in which, a convenience sample of 24 mothers completed a survey, the Dual-Employed Coping Skills (DECS) and were asked to answer two open-ended questions; &ldquo;What helped you the most to continue breast-feeding while working?&rdquo; and &ldquo;What has been the biggest barrier to combining breast-feeding and working?&rdquo; Qualitative data obtained from the open-ended questions was analyzed using basic content analysis. Research Findings: Two primary themes were identified, &ldquo;Help Themes,&rdquo; such as support of friends and family, and &ldquo;Barrier Themes,&rdquo; such as time issues or pumping issues. Practice Implications: Nurses can use to educate mothers in how to combine breast-feeding and working, as well as what to expect from themselves, their infants, their workplaces, and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:00:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:00:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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