2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160512
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Information Preference on Patient Education Outcomes
Abstract:
Effect of Information Preference on Patient Education Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Wood, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Xavier University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Contact Telephone:773.298.3746
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of patient information preference on response to pre-cardiac catheterization teaching. The conceptual framework for this study was an adaptation of the Lazarus model on stress and coping. Sixty-four naive cardiac catheterization patients were pre-tested on anxiety, preprocedural teaching received, and preference for information. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS), Cardiac Catheterization Information Preference Survey (CCIPS) were used to collect information the morning of the procedure. During and after the cardiac catheterization, subjects were rated on key behaviors. Subjects again completed the state portion of the STAI four to six hours post procedure. A majority of the sample received information from multiple sources, including a large number receiving information from non-professional sources. The most common method of information transmission was one to one teaching which had significant positive impact on subjects' understanding and readiness to undergo the procedure. Information provided by registered nurses in the hospital had the most significant impact on understanding of the information provided. Amount of information was correlated with satisfaction regarding information received, understanding and readiness for the procedure. There was significant reduction in state anxiety from pre to post catheterization. Results of hypothesis testing only partially supported the hypotheses of this study. The hypothesis that adequate information would result in lower pre-procedural state anxiety procedurally and in increased cooperation in behavior after cardiac catheterization was not supported. The hypothesis that adequate information as perceived by the subject would result in better cooperation during the cardiac catheterization procedure was supported by only one out of four measures (amount of information) used to determine adequacy. There was support for the hypothesis that adequate information would result in lower state anxiety scores post cardiac catheterization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Information Preference on Patient Education Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160512-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Information Preference on Patient Education Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wood, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Xavier University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773.298.3746</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wood@sxu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of patient information preference on response to pre-cardiac catheterization teaching. The conceptual framework for this study was an adaptation of the Lazarus model on stress and coping. Sixty-four naive cardiac catheterization patients were pre-tested on anxiety, preprocedural teaching received, and preference for information. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS), Cardiac Catheterization Information Preference Survey (CCIPS) were used to collect information the morning of the procedure. During and after the cardiac catheterization, subjects were rated on key behaviors. Subjects again completed the state portion of the STAI four to six hours post procedure. A majority of the sample received information from multiple sources, including a large number receiving information from non-professional sources. The most common method of information transmission was one to one teaching which had significant positive impact on subjects' understanding and readiness to undergo the procedure. Information provided by registered nurses in the hospital had the most significant impact on understanding of the information provided. Amount of information was correlated with satisfaction regarding information received, understanding and readiness for the procedure. There was significant reduction in state anxiety from pre to post catheterization. Results of hypothesis testing only partially supported the hypotheses of this study. The hypothesis that adequate information would result in lower pre-procedural state anxiety procedurally and in increased cooperation in behavior after cardiac catheterization was not supported. The hypothesis that adequate information as perceived by the subject would result in better cooperation during the cardiac catheterization procedure was supported by only one out of four measures (amount of information) used to determine adequacy. There was support for the hypothesis that adequate information would result in lower state anxiety scores post cardiac catheterization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:00:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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