Determinants of Successful Adoption of Physical Activity Adoption in Sedentary Working Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160513
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Successful Adoption of Physical Activity Adoption in Sedentary Working Women
Abstract:
Determinants of Successful Adoption of Physical Activity Adoption in Sedentary Working Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Purath, Janet, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.4028
This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief intervention to encourage sedentary women to adopt physical activity. The study used the PACE, a protocol for brief physical activity counseling, to guide a nursing intervention with 287 working women. The PACE is based on components of the Transtheoretical Model. A controlled trial, quasi-experimental design was implemented. Participants were recruited from a nurse-managed worksite wellness center that offers direct health screening services. The intervention group received a health screening, a brief intervention with contracting, and a booster telephone call two weeks later from a nurse practitioner. The intervention was tailored to the woman's reported stage of exercise behavior. The 134 women who received the intervention were compared with 153 women in a usual care control group who received health counseling that was not tailored to their stage of exercise behavior and no booster telephone call. Six weeks later, all participants were reassessed for perceived self-efficacy, barriers and benefits, and level of adoption of physical activity. Significant findings at 6 week follow up were that participants in the intervention group, when compared to their baseline scores, reported decreased perceived barriers to physical activity, increased physical activity, increased walking throughout the week, and increased walking for exercise. The intervention group also increased physical activity compared to controls. Participants with greater physical activity change scores were of minority ethnicity and reported higher perceived benefits of physical activity at baseline. Women who were more likely to reach therapeutic levels of physical activity perceived themselves as more active than their peers, reported more walking, and vigorous or moderate physical activity, and had higher baseline physical activity scores. This test of a brief, tailored strategy provides an important contribution to the search for efficient, effective ways for nurse practitioners to deliver community-based health promotion interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Successful Adoption of Physical Activity Adoption in Sedentary Working Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160513-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Successful Adoption of Physical Activity Adoption in Sedentary Working Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Purath, Janet, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.4028</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janet.purath.1@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief intervention to encourage sedentary women to adopt physical activity. The study used the PACE, a protocol for brief physical activity counseling, to guide a nursing intervention with 287 working women. The PACE is based on components of the Transtheoretical Model. A controlled trial, quasi-experimental design was implemented. Participants were recruited from a nurse-managed worksite wellness center that offers direct health screening services. The intervention group received a health screening, a brief intervention with contracting, and a booster telephone call two weeks later from a nurse practitioner. The intervention was tailored to the woman's reported stage of exercise behavior. The 134 women who received the intervention were compared with 153 women in a usual care control group who received health counseling that was not tailored to their stage of exercise behavior and no booster telephone call. Six weeks later, all participants were reassessed for perceived self-efficacy, barriers and benefits, and level of adoption of physical activity. Significant findings at 6 week follow up were that participants in the intervention group, when compared to their baseline scores, reported decreased perceived barriers to physical activity, increased physical activity, increased walking throughout the week, and increased walking for exercise. The intervention group also increased physical activity compared to controls. Participants with greater physical activity change scores were of minority ethnicity and reported higher perceived benefits of physical activity at baseline. Women who were more likely to reach therapeutic levels of physical activity perceived themselves as more active than their peers, reported more walking, and vigorous or moderate physical activity, and had higher baseline physical activity scores. This test of a brief, tailored strategy provides an important contribution to the search for efficient, effective ways for nurse practitioners to deliver community-based health promotion interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:00:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:00:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.