Effect of Resistance Training on Proprioception of Individuals with Osetoarthritis of the Knee

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160514
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Resistance Training on Proprioception of Individuals with Osetoarthritis of the Knee
Abstract:
Effect of Resistance Training on Proprioception of Individuals with Osetoarthritis of the Knee
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Topp, Robert, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Georgia
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 997 St. Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA
Contact Telephone:419.383.5864
The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 16 weeks of resistance training versus a control condition on knee proprioception among adults with knee Osteoarthritis (OA). Sixty-nine community-dwelling subjects who were previously diagnosed with knee OA volunteered and participated in this study. Subjects completed assessments of their knee proprioception bilaterally at baseline prior to being randomized into one of two treatment groups and following 16 weeks of their respective intervention. In addition these subjects were asked to identify the knee which they considered their most affected or painful side. Assessment of knee joint proprioception was assessed by five trials to detect knee joint movement at .40/sec. and five trials of the ability to reproduce 60 degrees of flexion of the knee joint using the protocol developed by Skinner et al. (1982). The sum and range of angular deflections of these five trials were calculated for both the subjects affected and unaffected legs. Subjects were then randomized into a nonexercise control (n=23) and an exercise group (n=46). Exercise subjects participated in dynamic or isometric resistance training of the lower limbs using TheraBand three times per week for 16 weeks. T-scores indicated that the exercise group exhibited improvements (p<.05) in all measures of proprioception in their affected leg (15-30%) and unaffected leg (21-33%). The control group did not demonstrate changes in the proprioception in their affected (-14 - 16%) leg and inconsistent or nonsignificant changes in their unaffected leg (6-38%). These findings indicate that resistance training may improve the neuromuscular proprioceptive sensory functioning of a knee joint affected by OA. Improved proprioception of the knee joint may contribute to increased functional capacity and a reduced risk for falls among older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Resistance Training on Proprioception of Individuals with Osetoarthritis of the Kneeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160514-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Resistance Training on Proprioception of Individuals with Osetoarthritis of the Knee</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Topp, Robert, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 997 St. Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419.383.5864</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rtopp@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 16 weeks of resistance training versus a control condition on knee proprioception among adults with knee Osteoarthritis (OA). Sixty-nine community-dwelling subjects who were previously diagnosed with knee OA volunteered and participated in this study. Subjects completed assessments of their knee proprioception bilaterally at baseline prior to being randomized into one of two treatment groups and following 16 weeks of their respective intervention. In addition these subjects were asked to identify the knee which they considered their most affected or painful side. Assessment of knee joint proprioception was assessed by five trials to detect knee joint movement at .40/sec. and five trials of the ability to reproduce 60 degrees of flexion of the knee joint using the protocol developed by Skinner et al. (1982). The sum and range of angular deflections of these five trials were calculated for both the subjects affected and unaffected legs. Subjects were then randomized into a nonexercise control (n=23) and an exercise group (n=46). Exercise subjects participated in dynamic or isometric resistance training of the lower limbs using TheraBand three times per week for 16 weeks. T-scores indicated that the exercise group exhibited improvements (p&lt;.05) in all measures of proprioception in their affected leg (15-30%) and unaffected leg (21-33%). The control group did not demonstrate changes in the proprioception in their affected (-14 - 16%) leg and inconsistent or nonsignificant changes in their unaffected leg (6-38%). These findings indicate that resistance training may improve the neuromuscular proprioceptive sensory functioning of a knee joint affected by OA. Improved proprioception of the knee joint may contribute to increased functional capacity and a reduced risk for falls among older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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