Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion: an Emerging Theory of Family Health Promotion in the Aftermath of Woman Abuse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160515
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion: an Emerging Theory of Family Health Promotion in the Aftermath of Woman Abuse
Abstract:
Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion: an Emerging Theory of Family Health Promotion in the Aftermath of Woman Abuse
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Contact Telephone:519.661.2111
The effects of woman abuse are longstanding for both women and children. Coping with the effects of abuse is intertwined with everyday living, including efforts to improve health. Yet, little is known about how a history of woman abuse affects family health promotion efforts. The purpose of this feminist grounded theory study was to develop a theoretical explanation of the health promotion processes of single-parent families (SPFs) who have left abusive partners/fathers. Data from repeat, semi-structured interviews conducted with a community sample of 40, diverse SPFs in two Canadian provinces (New Brunswick and Ontario) were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method (Glaser, 1978). Findings suggest that single mothers and their children are determined to create a better future but struggle to do so in the context of ongoing intrusion that stems from past abuse and its consequences: continued abuse or harassment, health problems, changes in lifestyle and the "costs" of getting much needed help. Families engage in "Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion" (the core process) on 2 levels: surviving (managing everyday needs) and capacity building (conscious, purposeful activity aimed at developing skills, assets and strengths needed to live healthy, productive lives long-term), but do so selectively in response to the degree of intrusion present. When intrusion is intense and pervasive, families devote much of their energy toward surviving. When intrusion is limited, and stability in everyday life is increased, families focus more on the future and begin to purposefully build capacity. Surviving and capacity building are enacted through 4 related subprocesses: regenerating family, providing, nurturing and rebuilding security. Nurses may support families' ability to promote their health and move beyond abuse both by reducing intrusion and by providing guidance as they engage in each of the 4 subprocesses. Implications for practice, research and policy will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion: an Emerging Theory of Family Health Promotion in the Aftermath of Woman Abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160515-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion: an Emerging Theory of Family Health Promotion in the Aftermath of Woman Abuse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">519.661.2111</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mfordg@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The effects of woman abuse are longstanding for both women and children. Coping with the effects of abuse is intertwined with everyday living, including efforts to improve health. Yet, little is known about how a history of woman abuse affects family health promotion efforts. The purpose of this feminist grounded theory study was to develop a theoretical explanation of the health promotion processes of single-parent families (SPFs) who have left abusive partners/fathers. Data from repeat, semi-structured interviews conducted with a community sample of 40, diverse SPFs in two Canadian provinces (New Brunswick and Ontario) were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method (Glaser, 1978). Findings suggest that single mothers and their children are determined to create a better future but struggle to do so in the context of ongoing intrusion that stems from past abuse and its consequences: continued abuse or harassment, health problems, changes in lifestyle and the &quot;costs&quot; of getting much needed help. Families engage in &quot;Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion&quot; (the core process) on 2 levels: surviving (managing everyday needs) and capacity building (conscious, purposeful activity aimed at developing skills, assets and strengths needed to live healthy, productive lives long-term), but do so selectively in response to the degree of intrusion present. When intrusion is intense and pervasive, families devote much of their energy toward surviving. When intrusion is limited, and stability in everyday life is increased, families focus more on the future and begin to purposefully build capacity. Surviving and capacity building are enacted through 4 related subprocesses: regenerating family, providing, nurturing and rebuilding security. Nurses may support families' ability to promote their health and move beyond abuse both by reducing intrusion and by providing guidance as they engage in each of the 4 subprocesses. Implications for practice, research and policy will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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