Caregivers' Stress, Functional Capability, and Self-Care Behavior Response to Symptoms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160517
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregivers' Stress, Functional Capability, and Self-Care Behavior Response to Symptoms
Abstract:
Caregivers' Stress, Functional Capability, and Self-Care Behavior Response to Symptoms
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lu, Yueh-Feng
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 168 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.2595
The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine the influence of caregiving stress on functional capability and self-care behavior response to symptoms, and to determine whether there is a mediating effect of functional capability on the relationship between caregiving stress and self-care behavior response to symptoms. Roy's Adaptation Model (Roy & Andrew, 1992) provided the theoretical framework for the study. A convenience sample of 99 caregivers (female=73, male=26) aged 50 or older and living in greater Cleveland community was recruited from the University Alzheimer Center registry. The mail survey included quantification of caregiving hassles, perceived self-assessed health, symptoms, depression, anxiety, and self-care behavior response to symptoms, which provided a detailed assessment of caregiver characteristics, physical and mental health status, functional performance, and self-care behavior response to symptoms. Data were analyzed using descriptive, Pearson r correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results indicated that caregivers who perceived high levels of caregiving stress were more likely to report poor self-assessed health, more presence of symptoms, high levels of depression, poor functional performance, and a high frequency of self-care behavior response to symptoms. Functional capability was significantly influenced by caregiving stress and was a mediating function on the relationship between caregiving stress and self-care behavior response to symptoms, especially depression. The findings could be useful in the development of intervention program to improve caregivers' functional capability. Overall, the findings from this study supported the study propositions derived from Roy's Adaptation Model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregivers' Stress, Functional Capability, and Self-Care Behavior Response to Symptomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160517-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregivers' Stress, Functional Capability, and Self-Care Behavior Response to Symptoms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lu, Yueh-Feng</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 168 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.2595 </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Yvonne.Lu@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine the influence of caregiving stress on functional capability and self-care behavior response to symptoms, and to determine whether there is a mediating effect of functional capability on the relationship between caregiving stress and self-care behavior response to symptoms. Roy's Adaptation Model (Roy &amp; Andrew, 1992) provided the theoretical framework for the study. A convenience sample of 99 caregivers (female=73, male=26) aged 50 or older and living in greater Cleveland community was recruited from the University Alzheimer Center registry. The mail survey included quantification of caregiving hassles, perceived self-assessed health, symptoms, depression, anxiety, and self-care behavior response to symptoms, which provided a detailed assessment of caregiver characteristics, physical and mental health status, functional performance, and self-care behavior response to symptoms. Data were analyzed using descriptive, Pearson r correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results indicated that caregivers who perceived high levels of caregiving stress were more likely to report poor self-assessed health, more presence of symptoms, high levels of depression, poor functional performance, and a high frequency of self-care behavior response to symptoms. Functional capability was significantly influenced by caregiving stress and was a mediating function on the relationship between caregiving stress and self-care behavior response to symptoms, especially depression. The findings could be useful in the development of intervention program to improve caregivers' functional capability. Overall, the findings from this study supported the study propositions derived from Roy's Adaptation Model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.