2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160518
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wandering: Aspects of Cognitive and Visuospatial Function
Abstract:
Wandering: Aspects of Cognitive and Visuospatial Function
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Beel-Bates, Cynthia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Research Associate II
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 2241 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.615.6343
The purpose of this descriptive multiple case design study (n=12, mean MMSE score=11/30) was to determine the contribution of selected visuospatial function to differences in parameters of wandering (episode frequency and duration, wandering patterns, and way-finding efficiency) in ambulatory women with probable AD. The "dual pathways model of visual processing" was used to operationalize and measure selected visuospatial functions of the dorsal visual pathway. To obtain an overall sense of each case's visuospatial function, cases were rank-ordered by absolute scores on each test of visuospatial function and distributed into cells of a 2 x 2 matrix crossing visuospatial and cognitive impairment: Cell 1=4 (good cognition, good vision); Cell 2=2 (good cognition, poor vision); Cell 3=2 (poor cognition, good vision); Cell 4=4 (poor cognition, poor vision). Locomoting cycle frequency, duration and pattern (direct, lapping, pacing and random) were observed and coded under natural nursing home conditions using a MacSema hand held bar coder. Results indicate that, in the domain of visuospatial function, women with milder cognitive impairment (Cells 1 and 2) were a more homogeneous group than those with more severe impairment, a finding consistent with that of previous studies. Frequency and duration of random wandering cycles increased in cases with moderate CI while lapping and pacing were similar in both mild and moderate CI cases. Surprisingly, cases with poor vision and poor CI decreased their overall locomotion and wandering behavior, but were the most efficient way finders. Thus vision appears to mitigate the overall amount of locomotion, and therefore, to the extent, wandering represents an amount of locomotion, wandering is negatively associated with poor vision. This study needs to be extended to explore these functions in a severely CI case group, however measuring visuospatial function in the severely CI remains a methodological challenge.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWandering: Aspects of Cognitive and Visuospatial Functionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160518-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wandering: Aspects of Cognitive and Visuospatial Function</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beel-Bates, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate II</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 2241 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.615.6343</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cabb@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive multiple case design study (n=12, mean MMSE score=11/30) was to determine the contribution of selected visuospatial function to differences in parameters of wandering (episode frequency and duration, wandering patterns, and way-finding efficiency) in ambulatory women with probable AD. The &quot;dual pathways model of visual processing&quot; was used to operationalize and measure selected visuospatial functions of the dorsal visual pathway. To obtain an overall sense of each case's visuospatial function, cases were rank-ordered by absolute scores on each test of visuospatial function and distributed into cells of a 2 x 2 matrix crossing visuospatial and cognitive impairment: Cell 1=4 (good cognition, good vision); Cell 2=2 (good cognition, poor vision); Cell 3=2 (poor cognition, good vision); Cell 4=4 (poor cognition, poor vision). Locomoting cycle frequency, duration and pattern (direct, lapping, pacing and random) were observed and coded under natural nursing home conditions using a MacSema hand held bar coder. Results indicate that, in the domain of visuospatial function, women with milder cognitive impairment (Cells 1 and 2) were a more homogeneous group than those with more severe impairment, a finding consistent with that of previous studies. Frequency and duration of random wandering cycles increased in cases with moderate CI while lapping and pacing were similar in both mild and moderate CI cases. Surprisingly, cases with poor vision and poor CI decreased their overall locomotion and wandering behavior, but were the most efficient way finders. Thus vision appears to mitigate the overall amount of locomotion, and therefore, to the extent, wandering represents an amount of locomotion, wandering is negatively associated with poor vision. This study needs to be extended to explore these functions in a severely CI case group, however measuring visuospatial function in the severely CI remains a methodological challenge.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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