Adherence to Cardiac Risk Factor Modification Behaviors and Problem Solving Skills in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence to Cardiac Risk Factor Modification Behaviors and Problem Solving Skills in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients
Abstract:
Adherence to Cardiac Risk Factor Modification Behaviors and Problem Solving Skills in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Moore, Shirley, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor and Dean for Research
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.5978
Problem solving skills have been shown to be an important component of the behavior change process. Guided by the Social Problem Solving Model of Ewart (1989), the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between problem solving skills and adherence to cardiac risk factor modification behaviors of diet regimen, medication regimen and stress management in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Measures of problem solving and adherence behaviors were taken in a convenience sample of 99 Phase II cardiac rehabilitation patients (66 males and 33 females) with myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass or angioplasty who ranged in age from 38 to 85 years (M=63, SD=11.5). Problem solving skills were measured using the Problem Solving Inventory (Heppner, 1988). Adherence to cardiac risk factor modification behaviors was measured using the Health Behavior Scale (Miller, Wikoff, McMahon, Garrett, & Gohnson, 1982, 1990). Data were collected in face-to-face interviews during the 6th week of cardiac rehabilitation. Results showed significant relationships between problem solving skills and adherence to prescribed diet (r=- .296, p=.003) and stress management (r=- .254, p=.011 ). No significant relationships were found between problem solving skills and adherence to medication regimen. No differences in problem solving skills or adherence behaviors were found between men and women and neither problem solving skills nor adherence behaviors varied by age or co-morbidity (measured by Charlson Scale, 1987). These findings suggest that interventions to increase patient problem solving skills may be helpful to improve cardiac patients' adherence to diet and stress management. The finding that problem solving was not related to adherence to medical regimen may be because adherence to a medical regimen is influenced by several factors unrelated to problem solving, such as severity of side effects or number of medications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to Cardiac Risk Factor Modification Behaviors and Problem Solving Skills in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adherence to Cardiac Risk Factor Modification Behaviors and Problem Solving Skills in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Shirley, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.5978</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smm8@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem solving skills have been shown to be an important component of the behavior change process. Guided by the Social Problem Solving Model of Ewart (1989), the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between problem solving skills and adherence to cardiac risk factor modification behaviors of diet regimen, medication regimen and stress management in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Measures of problem solving and adherence behaviors were taken in a convenience sample of 99 Phase II cardiac rehabilitation patients (66 males and 33 females) with myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass or angioplasty who ranged in age from 38 to 85 years (M=63, SD=11.5). Problem solving skills were measured using the Problem Solving Inventory (Heppner, 1988). Adherence to cardiac risk factor modification behaviors was measured using the Health Behavior Scale (Miller, Wikoff, McMahon, Garrett, &amp; Gohnson, 1982, 1990). Data were collected in face-to-face interviews during the 6th week of cardiac rehabilitation. Results showed significant relationships between problem solving skills and adherence to prescribed diet (r=- .296, p=.003) and stress management (r=- .254, p=.011 ). No significant relationships were found between problem solving skills and adherence to medication regimen. No differences in problem solving skills or adherence behaviors were found between men and women and neither problem solving skills nor adherence behaviors varied by age or co-morbidity (measured by Charlson Scale, 1987). These findings suggest that interventions to increase patient problem solving skills may be helpful to improve cardiac patients' adherence to diet and stress management. The finding that problem solving was not related to adherence to medical regimen may be because adherence to a medical regimen is influenced by several factors unrelated to problem solving, such as severity of side effects or number of medications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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