2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160524
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pregnancy Bed Rest: Maternal Weight Loss and Infant Birth Weight
Abstract:
Pregnancy Bed Rest: Maternal Weight Loss and Infant Birth Weight
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Maloni, Judith, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-2912
Despite a variety of physical and psychosocial side effects, obstetricians prescribe antepartum bed rest each for approximately 700,000 high-risk pregnant women. The purpose of this repeated measures longitudinal study was to assess new potential side effects of bed rest, i.e. non-optimal pregnancy weight gain as measured by weekly weights and infant birth weight obtained from hospital record. The convenience sample included 148 women on hospital bed rest (M=18.47 days, SD=13.7, R=2-70) with a singleton pregnancy and the primary diagnosis of preterm labor. The weekly rate of weight gain for women was 0.154 pounds, much less that Institute of Medicine recommendation of one pound/wk. Over 47% lost or did not gain weight during hospitalization. A higher prepregnancy Body Mass Index was negatively correlated with weight gain. Women who did not gain were more likely to give birth prior to 37 weeks gestation (RR=2.28, CI=1.18 to 4.42). Smoking and race were not associated with weight loss. Assessment of birth weight using new US gestational age, gender, and race specific reference standards demonstrated that 1) 75% of newborns had birth weights below the mean for gestational age, 2) 16.2% were growth restricted, and 3) 8.8% were small for gestational age. Only gestational age significantly effected infant birth weight (F=64.99, df=1, 144, p < .001, r squared=.799). When controlling for gestational age, length of maternal hospital bed rest did not significantly contribute to the variance explaining infant birth weight. Since bed rest treatment is not effective for reducing low birth weight, it should be prescribed only in select instances. Interventions are needed to prevent and rehabilitate the side effects of this treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePregnancy Bed Rest: Maternal Weight Loss and Infant Birth Weighten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160524-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pregnancy Bed Rest: Maternal Weight Loss and Infant Birth Weight</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maloni, Judith, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-2912</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jam44@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite a variety of physical and psychosocial side effects, obstetricians prescribe antepartum bed rest each for approximately 700,000 high-risk pregnant women. The purpose of this repeated measures longitudinal study was to assess new potential side effects of bed rest, i.e. non-optimal pregnancy weight gain as measured by weekly weights and infant birth weight obtained from hospital record. The convenience sample included 148 women on hospital bed rest (M=18.47 days, SD=13.7, R=2-70) with a singleton pregnancy and the primary diagnosis of preterm labor. The weekly rate of weight gain for women was 0.154 pounds, much less that Institute of Medicine recommendation of one pound/wk. Over 47% lost or did not gain weight during hospitalization. A higher prepregnancy Body Mass Index was negatively correlated with weight gain. Women who did not gain were more likely to give birth prior to 37 weeks gestation (RR=2.28, CI=1.18 to 4.42). Smoking and race were not associated with weight loss. Assessment of birth weight using new US gestational age, gender, and race specific reference standards demonstrated that 1) 75% of newborns had birth weights below the mean for gestational age, 2) 16.2% were growth restricted, and 3) 8.8% were small for gestational age. Only gestational age significantly effected infant birth weight (F=64.99, df=1, 144, p &lt; .001, r squared=.799). When controlling for gestational age, length of maternal hospital bed rest did not significantly contribute to the variance explaining infant birth weight. Since bed rest treatment is not effective for reducing low birth weight, it should be prescribed only in select instances. Interventions are needed to prevent and rehabilitate the side effects of this treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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