2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160527
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Final Journey of Life
Abstract:
Final Journey of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Forbes, Mitzi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 647, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.3986
Hospice programs focus largely on symptom management and palliative care supplemented with social services. The final journey of life is a spiritual one with spiritual care often felt to be inadequately addressed. The purpose of this research is to document patient and family outcomes of care combining traditional and complementary interventions in meeting the physical, psychological and spiritual needs of dying patients. Twelve employees of a hospice organization which combine traditional and alternative interventions participated in a qualitative project. The research questions was: What are the responses of the patients and families to our interventions? Responses were analyzed by means of concept mapping. Participants identified seven clusters as accurately representing the experience of their patients and families to interventions during the dying process. The clusters are: Physical manifestations of a transition taking place, changing focus from the external to the internal world, resolution of emotional issues, mentally relinquishing control of life, resolution of relational issues, resolving spiritual issues, and becoming familiar with another dimension. The seven clusters fit into a model that represents the final journey of life. It is essential to manage physical symptoms if patients and their families are to resolve psychosociospiritual issues at the end of life. Only then is the patient able to relinquish attachment to this life and transcend to the other dimension. Knowing the model of the final journey allows for assessment and support as families share the final journey together towards a loved ones' peaceful death.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFinal Journey of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160527-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Final Journey of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forbes, Mitzi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 647, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.3986</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mforbes@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hospice programs focus largely on symptom management and palliative care supplemented with social services. The final journey of life is a spiritual one with spiritual care often felt to be inadequately addressed. The purpose of this research is to document patient and family outcomes of care combining traditional and complementary interventions in meeting the physical, psychological and spiritual needs of dying patients. Twelve employees of a hospice organization which combine traditional and alternative interventions participated in a qualitative project. The research questions was: What are the responses of the patients and families to our interventions? Responses were analyzed by means of concept mapping. Participants identified seven clusters as accurately representing the experience of their patients and families to interventions during the dying process. The clusters are: Physical manifestations of a transition taking place, changing focus from the external to the internal world, resolution of emotional issues, mentally relinquishing control of life, resolution of relational issues, resolving spiritual issues, and becoming familiar with another dimension. The seven clusters fit into a model that represents the final journey of life. It is essential to manage physical symptoms if patients and their families are to resolve psychosociospiritual issues at the end of life. Only then is the patient able to relinquish attachment to this life and transcend to the other dimension. Knowing the model of the final journey allows for assessment and support as families share the final journey together towards a loved ones' peaceful death.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:01:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:01:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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