2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160532
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NICU Lighting Levels Revisited: an Examination of Research Utilization
Abstract:
NICU Lighting Levels Revisited: an Examination of Research Utilization
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lotas, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.5129
Objectives 1) describe light levels and variability in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's) in the Southeastern U.S. 2) compare current NICU lighting practices to those described in the original research. Design: This descriptive study was completed in two phases: a survey mailed to hospital NICU's; and site visits to measure light levels in a subset of hospitals responding to the mailed survey. Sample: Hospitals in Southeastern U.S. who self-identified as having NICU services formed the population for this study. The sample for the survey portion of the study consisted of 69 hospitals with a subset of 20 hospitals selected for site visits. Variables: 1) The levels of NICU lighting and variability throughout the 24 hour period by self-report and, 2) direct measurements of light in footcandles using an ExTech Model 407026 Light Meter. Methods: Surveys were mailed to NICU's asking respondents to describe NICU lighting policies and practices and to compare the NICU lighting to that of other areas of the hospital. A subset of the survey respondents was then selected for site visits. The investigators measured lighting levels at three time points (8-10am; 6-8pm; 12mn-2am) and at multiple sites within each unit. Findings: 1) 70% of units described lighting levels as moderate or high 2) Few units reported any systematic variability in lighting over 24 hours 3) Little congruence was demonstrated between self-reports of light levels and measured light levels. 4) Mean lighting levels were lower than those reported in the early research Conclusions Research on the effects of excessive NICU lighting levels has been widely reported but has not resulted in clear recommendations for practice Although an overall mean reduction in mean lighting levels has occurred, there is no consistent pattern of reduction and little agreement about what are appropriate lighting practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNICU Lighting Levels Revisited: an Examination of Research Utilizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160532-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NICU Lighting Levels Revisited: an Examination of Research Utilization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lotas, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.5129</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjl25@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives 1) describe light levels and variability in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's) in the Southeastern U.S. 2) compare current NICU lighting practices to those described in the original research. Design: This descriptive study was completed in two phases: a survey mailed to hospital NICU's; and site visits to measure light levels in a subset of hospitals responding to the mailed survey. Sample: Hospitals in Southeastern U.S. who self-identified as having NICU services formed the population for this study. The sample for the survey portion of the study consisted of 69 hospitals with a subset of 20 hospitals selected for site visits. Variables: 1) The levels of NICU lighting and variability throughout the 24 hour period by self-report and, 2) direct measurements of light in footcandles using an ExTech Model 407026 Light Meter. Methods: Surveys were mailed to NICU's asking respondents to describe NICU lighting policies and practices and to compare the NICU lighting to that of other areas of the hospital. A subset of the survey respondents was then selected for site visits. The investigators measured lighting levels at three time points (8-10am; 6-8pm; 12mn-2am) and at multiple sites within each unit. Findings: 1) 70% of units described lighting levels as moderate or high 2) Few units reported any systematic variability in lighting over 24 hours 3) Little congruence was demonstrated between self-reports of light levels and measured light levels. 4) Mean lighting levels were lower than those reported in the early research Conclusions Research on the effects of excessive NICU lighting levels has been widely reported but has not resulted in clear recommendations for practice Although an overall mean reduction in mean lighting levels has occurred, there is no consistent pattern of reduction and little agreement about what are appropriate lighting practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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