Psychological Stress and Illness Uncertainty in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship with Disease Symptomatology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160535
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological Stress and Illness Uncertainty in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship with Disease Symptomatology
Abstract:
Psychological Stress and Illness Uncertainty in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship with Disease Symptomatology
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Sorenson, Matthew
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease in which the individual must live with a degree of disease related uncertainty. Such a state of illness uncertainty is conceptualized as contributing to increased levels of psychological stress. In turn, increased levels of stress may contribute to disease exacerbation. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationship among psychological stress, coping, illness uncertainty and clinical disease in outpatients with MS (n=43) and healthy controls without MS. Data was collected through the administration of self-report measures (Perceived Stress Scale, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Community Version, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Profile of Mood States, Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Checklist and the Life Experiences Survey). Significant direct correlations were found between illness uncertainty and perceived stress. Increased levels of perceived stress and illness uncertainty directly correlated with the incidence of MS symptomatology; with perceived stress demonstrating a stronger correlation with disease symptoms than did illness uncertainty. Disease symptomatology also correlated significantly with all measures of perceived stress and negative mood. MS subjects displayed significantly higher scores on measures of perceived stress, tension, anger, depression, and fatigue than did control subjects without MS. The findings reinforce clinical reports from MS patients that psychological stress is linked with disease symptoms. In conclusion, the findings support the need for the development of nursing interventions that address stress appraisal and coping behavior, with an aim toward management of symptom expression in MS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological Stress and Illness Uncertainty in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship with Disease Symptomatologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160535-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychological Stress and Illness Uncertainty in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship with Disease Symptomatology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorenson, Matthew</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease in which the individual must live with a degree of disease related uncertainty. Such a state of illness uncertainty is conceptualized as contributing to increased levels of psychological stress. In turn, increased levels of stress may contribute to disease exacerbation. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationship among psychological stress, coping, illness uncertainty and clinical disease in outpatients with MS (n=43) and healthy controls without MS. Data was collected through the administration of self-report measures (Perceived Stress Scale, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Community Version, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Profile of Mood States, Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Checklist and the Life Experiences Survey). Significant direct correlations were found between illness uncertainty and perceived stress. Increased levels of perceived stress and illness uncertainty directly correlated with the incidence of MS symptomatology; with perceived stress demonstrating a stronger correlation with disease symptoms than did illness uncertainty. Disease symptomatology also correlated significantly with all measures of perceived stress and negative mood. MS subjects displayed significantly higher scores on measures of perceived stress, tension, anger, depression, and fatigue than did control subjects without MS. The findings reinforce clinical reports from MS patients that psychological stress is linked with disease symptoms. In conclusion, the findings support the need for the development of nursing interventions that address stress appraisal and coping behavior, with an aim toward management of symptom expression in MS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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