2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160536
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reliability and Stability of a Web-Based Evaluation Tool for Depression
Abstract:
Reliability and Stability of a Web-Based Evaluation Tool for Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Belcher, Jan
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 136 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.2618
As the Internet explodes with health information, health care providers are concerned about the quality of this information. Researchers need to create reliable evaluation tools so that health care providers can examine the quality of Internet health information. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and stability of an evaluation tool for depression web sites for use by health care providers. Although this study used measurement theory as the theoretical framework, its broad framework was the Technology Assessment Model. The sample consisted of 61 volunteer senior nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate psychiatric-mental health course at two different times. For methods, 23 students in one class evaluated three depression web sites at two times, four weeks apart. Six months later, another class of 38 students evaluated the same web sites. Students used the Web Depression Tool (WDT) each time they evaluated the web sites. The 44 question tool examined content, construction, and usefulness of the web site. Students completed the evaluation at school, work and home. For results, WDT stability was assessed with the same group of students evaluating the web sites four weeks apart. The tool had very good stability between the two time periods (r=0.652, p=0.0001). With one item exception, all scales at all time periods showed good internal consistency. Intrarater reliability was very good (r=0.639, p=0.0001). During the three evaluation periods, there were no significant changes over time when the three web sites scores were combined. In conclusion, WDT demonstrated reliability and stability with 2 groups of student raters. Web-based evaluation tools need adequate psychometric properties so that health care providers can critically evaluate web sites that the public use to obtain health information. Further research should evaluate the tool's usefulness with different groups of Internet users.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReliability and Stability of a Web-Based Evaluation Tool for Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160536-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reliability and Stability of a Web-Based Evaluation Tool for Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belcher, Jan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 136 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.2618</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.belcher@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the Internet explodes with health information, health care providers are concerned about the quality of this information. Researchers need to create reliable evaluation tools so that health care providers can examine the quality of Internet health information. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and stability of an evaluation tool for depression web sites for use by health care providers. Although this study used measurement theory as the theoretical framework, its broad framework was the Technology Assessment Model. The sample consisted of 61 volunteer senior nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate psychiatric-mental health course at two different times. For methods, 23 students in one class evaluated three depression web sites at two times, four weeks apart. Six months later, another class of 38 students evaluated the same web sites. Students used the Web Depression Tool (WDT) each time they evaluated the web sites. The 44 question tool examined content, construction, and usefulness of the web site. Students completed the evaluation at school, work and home. For results, WDT stability was assessed with the same group of students evaluating the web sites four weeks apart. The tool had very good stability between the two time periods (r=0.652, p=0.0001). With one item exception, all scales at all time periods showed good internal consistency. Intrarater reliability was very good (r=0.639, p=0.0001). During the three evaluation periods, there were no significant changes over time when the three web sites scores were combined. In conclusion, WDT demonstrated reliability and stability with 2 groups of student raters. Web-based evaluation tools need adequate psychometric properties so that health care providers can critically evaluate web sites that the public use to obtain health information. Further research should evaluate the tool's usefulness with different groups of Internet users.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.