2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160537
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Education about Acute Confusion: a New Method to Assess Learning
Abstract:
Education about Acute Confusion: a New Method to Assess Learning
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Ludwick, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.7930
The primary purpose of the study was to examine the efficacy of a continuing education program for changing nurses' clinical decisions regarding acute confusion (AC). Social interaction theory, which explains that people act on the basis of "meanings" that have evolved from personal interaction and subjective interpretation, framed this research. Thus this study focused on changing the meaning of AC and its treatment to nurses through an educational program. In this experimental study, the sample of 108 nurses from a large urban hospital rated 540 patient vignettes, but unlike many continuing education (CE) programs this study used the factorial survey method to assess learning. Half of the nurses participated in a 1-hour CE program on AC prior to completing the survey and 50 nurses did not. The factorial survey is a unique blend of the vignette method and its classic factorial design with sample survey procedures. Analysis of the vignettes was done using ordinary least squares regression. The primary result was that CE did make a significant difference in some aspects of the nurses' decision-making. Further analysis of data revealed the patients' behavior and medical diagnoses were consistent predictors of decision-making, but that bias existed that influenced decision-making. Other results of interest were that eighty percent of nurses reported caring for at least one confused patient a day and 75% of nurses indicated on the job experience as the source of their knowledge about AC. In conclusion, changes continue to be needed in the way nurses come to recognize and treat AC. This study shows that education can change the knowledge about AC, and begins to identify biases that impact decision-making about confusion. Further the study demonstrates a robust experimental method for assessing learning outcomes that goes beyond a paper and pencil test of knowledge questions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducation about Acute Confusion: a New Method to Assess Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160537-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Education about Acute Confusion: a New Method to Assess Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludwick, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.7930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rludwick@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The primary purpose of the study was to examine the efficacy of a continuing education program for changing nurses' clinical decisions regarding acute confusion (AC). Social interaction theory, which explains that people act on the basis of &quot;meanings&quot; that have evolved from personal interaction and subjective interpretation, framed this research. Thus this study focused on changing the meaning of AC and its treatment to nurses through an educational program. In this experimental study, the sample of 108 nurses from a large urban hospital rated 540 patient vignettes, but unlike many continuing education (CE) programs this study used the factorial survey method to assess learning. Half of the nurses participated in a 1-hour CE program on AC prior to completing the survey and 50 nurses did not. The factorial survey is a unique blend of the vignette method and its classic factorial design with sample survey procedures. Analysis of the vignettes was done using ordinary least squares regression. The primary result was that CE did make a significant difference in some aspects of the nurses' decision-making. Further analysis of data revealed the patients' behavior and medical diagnoses were consistent predictors of decision-making, but that bias existed that influenced decision-making. Other results of interest were that eighty percent of nurses reported caring for at least one confused patient a day and 75% of nurses indicated on the job experience as the source of their knowledge about AC. In conclusion, changes continue to be needed in the way nurses come to recognize and treat AC. This study shows that education can change the knowledge about AC, and begins to identify biases that impact decision-making about confusion. Further the study demonstrates a robust experimental method for assessing learning outcomes that goes beyond a paper and pencil test of knowledge questions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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