Healthy Siblings' Perceptions of Seriousness and Visibility of Illness in Childhood Chronic Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160539
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healthy Siblings' Perceptions of Seriousness and Visibility of Illness in Childhood Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Healthy Siblings' Perceptions of Seriousness and Visibility of Illness in Childhood Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Gallo, Agatha
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 856 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.1868
How healthy siblings of children with chronic illness view their psychosocial adjustment has been documented. However, little is known about how illness characteristics are related to sibling adjustment and family functioning in families of children with diabetes and asthma. The purpose of this study of 90 healthy siblings of children with diabetes (n=45) and asthma (n=45) was two-fold: 1) to determine if differences exist in siblings' perceptions of seriousness and visibility of illness, and 2) to examine relationships between visibility and seriousness of illness, and self concept and family functioning. The siblings completed the Self-Perception Profile for Children and the Family APGAR for Children. Visibility and seriousness of illness were measured by single self-report items. Non-parametric statistics were used for data analysis. The siblings in the diabetes group had higher ratings on seriousness than siblings in the asthma group (p < .02). No significant differences were found in visibility between the siblings in the asthma and diabetes groups. Visibility and seriousness were significantly positively correlated for the siblings in the asthma group (rs =.53, p=.01), but not in the diabetes group. For the diabetes group, visibility was inversely correlated with behavioral conduct (rs =- .36, p < .01), while seriousness was inversely related to scholastic competence (rs=- .50, p < .01). For the asthma group, visibility was inversely correlated with social acceptance (rs=- .38, p=.01) and athletic competence (rs=- .29, p=.05), while seriousness was inversely correlate to athletic competence (rs =- 42, p=.01). No relationships were found between visibility or seriousness of illness scores and the Family APGAR for Children scores. Study results support considering illness characteristics such as visibility and seriousness of illness when studying sibling adjustment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealthy Siblings' Perceptions of Seriousness and Visibility of Illness in Childhood Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160539-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healthy Siblings' Perceptions of Seriousness and Visibility of Illness in Childhood Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallo, Agatha</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 856 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.1868</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">agallo@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">How healthy siblings of children with chronic illness view their psychosocial adjustment has been documented. However, little is known about how illness characteristics are related to sibling adjustment and family functioning in families of children with diabetes and asthma. The purpose of this study of 90 healthy siblings of children with diabetes (n=45) and asthma (n=45) was two-fold: 1) to determine if differences exist in siblings' perceptions of seriousness and visibility of illness, and 2) to examine relationships between visibility and seriousness of illness, and self concept and family functioning. The siblings completed the Self-Perception Profile for Children and the Family APGAR for Children. Visibility and seriousness of illness were measured by single self-report items. Non-parametric statistics were used for data analysis. The siblings in the diabetes group had higher ratings on seriousness than siblings in the asthma group (p &lt; .02). No significant differences were found in visibility between the siblings in the asthma and diabetes groups. Visibility and seriousness were significantly positively correlated for the siblings in the asthma group (rs =.53, p=.01), but not in the diabetes group. For the diabetes group, visibility was inversely correlated with behavioral conduct (rs =- .36, p &lt; .01), while seriousness was inversely related to scholastic competence (rs=- .50, p &lt; .01). For the asthma group, visibility was inversely correlated with social acceptance (rs=- .38, p=.01) and athletic competence (rs=- .29, p=.05), while seriousness was inversely correlate to athletic competence (rs =- 42, p=.01). No relationships were found between visibility or seriousness of illness scores and the Family APGAR for Children scores. Study results support considering illness characteristics such as visibility and seriousness of illness when studying sibling adjustment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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