2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160542
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Vulnerable Populations: Using a Framework of Intersectionality
Abstract:
Vulnerable Populations: Using a Framework of Intersectionality
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lambert, Joette
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.962.2000
Doing research on vulnerable populations is difficult and presents serious sampling issues. When studied populations are subject to multiple vulnerabilities, yet only one (i.e., race, or gender, or age) is the focus, an inaccurate picture of the members of that population may result. Intersectionality is a theoretical framework found primarily in the sociological and political science literature. Black feminist scholars use it to describe the oppression and discrimination Black women face because of their gender and race. Using this overarching framework may be a very useful approach for studying vulnerable populations, including people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). HIV is but one of the many vulnerabilities that color the experience of many people with the disease. As the population of young people (ages 13 - 24) with HIV/AIDS becomes primarily female, and Black and Hispanic, adolescent and young women infected with HIV are a particularly good example of the multiple vulnerabilities of a vulnerable population and a population where using the framework of intersectionality of particular variables may yield a larger, richer picture of this marginalized, vulnerable population. Attention to this construct can improve access, recruitment, retention, and outcomes with research on vulnerable populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVulnerable Populations: Using a Framework of Intersectionalityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160542-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Vulnerable Populations: Using a Framework of Intersectionality</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lambert, Joette</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.962.2000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jolambert@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Doing research on vulnerable populations is difficult and presents serious sampling issues. When studied populations are subject to multiple vulnerabilities, yet only one (i.e., race, or gender, or age) is the focus, an inaccurate picture of the members of that population may result. Intersectionality is a theoretical framework found primarily in the sociological and political science literature. Black feminist scholars use it to describe the oppression and discrimination Black women face because of their gender and race. Using this overarching framework may be a very useful approach for studying vulnerable populations, including people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). HIV is but one of the many vulnerabilities that color the experience of many people with the disease. As the population of young people (ages 13 - 24) with HIV/AIDS becomes primarily female, and Black and Hispanic, adolescent and young women infected with HIV are a particularly good example of the multiple vulnerabilities of a vulnerable population and a population where using the framework of intersectionality of particular variables may yield a larger, richer picture of this marginalized, vulnerable population. Attention to this construct can improve access, recruitment, retention, and outcomes with research on vulnerable populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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