The Relationship of Empowerment and Selected Personality Characteristics to Nursing Job Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160545
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Empowerment and Selected Personality Characteristics to Nursing Job Satisfaction
Abstract:
The Relationship of Empowerment and Selected Personality Characteristics to Nursing Job Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Laschinger, Heather
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Professor & Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Contact Telephone:519.661.4065
This study represents a secondary data analysis of a larger research endeavor and was undertaken to better understand the determinants of job satisfaction for hospital based nurses. Job satisfaction has been extensively researched in nursing, yet remains elusive to achieve. It is best conceptualized as a subjective state that is a function of elements within the work place as well as attitudes and behaviors, shaped by personal characteristics. Thus there should be factors in the workplace as well as personal factors which contribute to job satisfaction. Kanter's theory of structural empowerment provided the framework for organizational factors, while Spreitzer's theory of psychological empowerment explained logical outcomes of managerial efforts to create structural conditions of empowerment. Selected personal attributes were also considered to hopefully promote job satisfaction. The study used a non-experimental, correlational design to determine if achievement and mastery needs could explain additional variance in job satisfaction over and above that explained by both structural and psychological empowerment. Correlation matrices and hierarchical regression analyses were used to answer the research questions. Surveys were mailed to 300 male and 300 female randomly selected nurses, with 347 nurses constituting the final sample. While structural and psychological empowerment together predicted 38% of the variance in job satisfaction, no additional increase in explanatory power was provided by the addition of achievement and mastery needs. Other personal attributes may be found in future research to improve job satisfaction, but the powerful contribution of structural and psychological empowerment is a significant finding. While the strengthening of psychological empowerment may be beyond the purview of nursing administrators, the provision of opportunities to exercise psychological empowerment is not. Therefore, through careful manipulation of the hospital environment, both structural and psychological empowerment may be increased, resulting in greater job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and ultimately improved patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Empowerment and Selected Personality Characteristics to Nursing Job Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160545-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Empowerment and Selected Personality Characteristics to Nursing Job Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Laschinger, Heather</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">519.661.4065</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hkl@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study represents a secondary data analysis of a larger research endeavor and was undertaken to better understand the determinants of job satisfaction for hospital based nurses. Job satisfaction has been extensively researched in nursing, yet remains elusive to achieve. It is best conceptualized as a subjective state that is a function of elements within the work place as well as attitudes and behaviors, shaped by personal characteristics. Thus there should be factors in the workplace as well as personal factors which contribute to job satisfaction. Kanter's theory of structural empowerment provided the framework for organizational factors, while Spreitzer's theory of psychological empowerment explained logical outcomes of managerial efforts to create structural conditions of empowerment. Selected personal attributes were also considered to hopefully promote job satisfaction. The study used a non-experimental, correlational design to determine if achievement and mastery needs could explain additional variance in job satisfaction over and above that explained by both structural and psychological empowerment. Correlation matrices and hierarchical regression analyses were used to answer the research questions. Surveys were mailed to 300 male and 300 female randomly selected nurses, with 347 nurses constituting the final sample. While structural and psychological empowerment together predicted 38% of the variance in job satisfaction, no additional increase in explanatory power was provided by the addition of achievement and mastery needs. Other personal attributes may be found in future research to improve job satisfaction, but the powerful contribution of structural and psychological empowerment is a significant finding. While the strengthening of psychological empowerment may be beyond the purview of nursing administrators, the provision of opportunities to exercise psychological empowerment is not. Therefore, through careful manipulation of the hospital environment, both structural and psychological empowerment may be increased, resulting in greater job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and ultimately improved patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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