Workplace Empowerment, Collaborative Work Relationships and Job Strain in Nurse Practitioners

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160546
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Empowerment, Collaborative Work Relationships and Job Strain in Nurse Practitioners
Abstract:
Workplace Empowerment, Collaborative Work Relationships and Job Strain in Nurse Practitioners
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Almost, Joan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Contact Telephone:519.661.2111
The delivery of high quality care is important to nurse practitioners (NPs) and achieving excellence requires practitioners who are empowered to be effective in their roles. Kanter (1993) maintains that work environments that provide access to information, resources, support, and the opportunity to develop are empowering and enable employees to better accomplish their work. Employees with sufficient power are more committed, more likely to engage in collaborative relationships, and able to deal with the demands of their work. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between NPs' perceptions of workplace empowerment, collaboration with physicians and managers, and job strain. A predictive nonexperimental survey design was used in a sample of 117 Canadian NPs. The Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire, Collaborative Behavior Scale, and Job Content Questionnaire were used to measure the major study variables. Empowered NPs reported higher levels of collaboration with physicians and managers and lower levels of job strain. The combined effect of workplace empowerment and collaboration explained 43% of the variance in job strain with acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and 20% of the variance in job strain with primary care nurse practitioners (PCNPs). PCNPs were significantly higher than ACNPs in their perceptions of workplace empowerment, collaboration with managers, and job strain. These results support the proposition that the extent to which NPs have access to information, support, resources, and opportunities in their work environment has an impact on the extent of collaboration with physicians and managers and the degree of job strain experienced in the work setting. These findings will benefit administrators and nursing leaders in their efforts to create empowering work environments which enable NPs to provide excellent quality patient care, and achieve organizational outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Empowerment, Collaborative Work Relationships and Job Strain in Nurse Practitionersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160546-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace Empowerment, Collaborative Work Relationships and Job Strain in Nurse Practitioners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Almost, Joan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Health Sciences Addition, Room H74, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">519.661.2111</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmalmost@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The delivery of high quality care is important to nurse practitioners (NPs) and achieving excellence requires practitioners who are empowered to be effective in their roles. Kanter (1993) maintains that work environments that provide access to information, resources, support, and the opportunity to develop are empowering and enable employees to better accomplish their work. Employees with sufficient power are more committed, more likely to engage in collaborative relationships, and able to deal with the demands of their work. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between NPs' perceptions of workplace empowerment, collaboration with physicians and managers, and job strain. A predictive nonexperimental survey design was used in a sample of 117 Canadian NPs. The Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire, Collaborative Behavior Scale, and Job Content Questionnaire were used to measure the major study variables. Empowered NPs reported higher levels of collaboration with physicians and managers and lower levels of job strain. The combined effect of workplace empowerment and collaboration explained 43% of the variance in job strain with acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and 20% of the variance in job strain with primary care nurse practitioners (PCNPs). PCNPs were significantly higher than ACNPs in their perceptions of workplace empowerment, collaboration with managers, and job strain. These results support the proposition that the extent to which NPs have access to information, support, resources, and opportunities in their work environment has an impact on the extent of collaboration with physicians and managers and the degree of job strain experienced in the work setting. These findings will benefit administrators and nursing leaders in their efforts to create empowering work environments which enable NPs to provide excellent quality patient care, and achieve organizational outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:02:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:02:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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