2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160551
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Binge Drinking, Sensible Drinking, and Abstinence after Alcohol-Related Crashes
Abstract:
Binge Drinking, Sensible Drinking, and Abstinence after Alcohol-Related Crashes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 249 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5268
Screening for alcohol problems involves asking the patient questions about drinking through a structured interview. Often screening is followed by a brief intervention, a time-limited counseling strategy that has not been studied well in the motor vehicle crash (MVC) population. Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that non-alcohol dependent patients who receive the most intensive brief intervention (brief counseling) following a serious alcohol-related MVC would have reduced binge drinking in the year following the crash as compared to controls (screening only) and a less intensive intervention (simple advice). Framework: We used crisis intervention theory as the framework for our randomized clinical trial. Methods: We enrolled non-alcohol dependent subjects who were seriously injured in alcohol-related MVCs. Following informed consent, randomization, and an initial interview, subjects in the experimental groups received the intervention. All subjects were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months. Measures of drinking included binges (4 or more standard drinks on one occasion for males and 3 or more standard drinks on one occasion for females), sensible drinking (14 or fewer drinks/week for men without binges and 7 or fewer drinks/week for women without binges), and abstinence (no drinking). Sample: 186 non-alcohol dependent, seriously injured individuals ages 18-45 years were enrolled in the protocol during hospitalization. Results: At baseline, mean binges/month (b/m) were 5.88 and at 12 months were 2.02 b/m. Although there was no significant difference by condition, at 12 months the brief counseling group had the lowest rate of binge drinking (1.97 b/m). Rates of abstinence and sensible drinking increased across all three groups. Conclusions: Subjects markedly decreased their drinking in the first 12 months after injury. Whether these drinking patterns were a result of the crash, injury, screening for alcohol use, or combination of these factors is difficult to determine.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBinge Drinking, Sensible Drinking, and Abstinence after Alcohol-Related Crashesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160551-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Binge Drinking, Sensible Drinking, and Abstinence after Alcohol-Related Crashes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 249 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn.sommers@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Screening for alcohol problems involves asking the patient questions about drinking through a structured interview. Often screening is followed by a brief intervention, a time-limited counseling strategy that has not been studied well in the motor vehicle crash (MVC) population. Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that non-alcohol dependent patients who receive the most intensive brief intervention (brief counseling) following a serious alcohol-related MVC would have reduced binge drinking in the year following the crash as compared to controls (screening only) and a less intensive intervention (simple advice). Framework: We used crisis intervention theory as the framework for our randomized clinical trial. Methods: We enrolled non-alcohol dependent subjects who were seriously injured in alcohol-related MVCs. Following informed consent, randomization, and an initial interview, subjects in the experimental groups received the intervention. All subjects were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months. Measures of drinking included binges (4 or more standard drinks on one occasion for males and 3 or more standard drinks on one occasion for females), sensible drinking (14 or fewer drinks/week for men without binges and 7 or fewer drinks/week for women without binges), and abstinence (no drinking). Sample: 186 non-alcohol dependent, seriously injured individuals ages 18-45 years were enrolled in the protocol during hospitalization. Results: At baseline, mean binges/month (b/m) were 5.88 and at 12 months were 2.02 b/m. Although there was no significant difference by condition, at 12 months the brief counseling group had the lowest rate of binge drinking (1.97 b/m). Rates of abstinence and sensible drinking increased across all three groups. Conclusions: Subjects markedly decreased their drinking in the first 12 months after injury. Whether these drinking patterns were a result of the crash, injury, screening for alcohol use, or combination of these factors is difficult to determine.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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