2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160552
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Low Risk Drinking: Effectiveness of Brief Intervention
Abstract:
Enhancing Low Risk Drinking: Effectiveness of Brief Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Dyehouse, Janice
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 231 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5269
The purpose of this research was to test the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing alcohol consumption for non-dependent drinkers hospitalized for an alcohol-related injury. Crisis theory indicates that an alcohol-related injury provides a teachable moment for clients to consider changing behavior. The sample consisted of 145 subjects, 115 (79%) males, 99 Caucasians, 46 African Americans with a mean age of 37 (+/-13.5). Subjects BAC on admission ranged from 0-400 with a mean of 133.68 (+/-123.16) and a mean GGT of 40.48 (+/- 55.42, range 0-404) and an Injury Severity Score of 7.80 (+/-5.65). The study used an experimental design with subject randomized to two experimental and one control group. Subjects were interviewed baseline, 1,3,6, and 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption. Across the 12 months all subjects decreased the number of binges per month from 9 to 3, decreased drinking days in a month from 14 to 9, decreased drinks per drinking day from 7 to 3 and increased their low risk drinking from 1.7 weeks a month to 2.6 weeks per month. For all subjects there was a dramatic decrease in drinking following the injury with a gradual increase in drinking, which did not return to pre-injury levels. Forty-four percent of subjects were abstinent for the entire year. Post injury subjects delayed their return to binge drinking by 5.5 months. There was not a significant difference on any of the drinking outcomes by experimental or control conditions. Thus it appears that the injury is of sufficient impact to motivate individuals to consider changing their drinking behavior. The injury may have triggered off the natural recovery process. Alternately, the frequent assessment of drinking behavior may have acted as an intervention in itself. Research supported by Grant 10355 National Institute for Alcohol abuse and Alcoholism.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Low Risk Drinking: Effectiveness of Brief Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160552-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enhancing Low Risk Drinking: Effectiveness of Brief Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dyehouse, Janice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 231 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5269</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.dyehouse@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to test the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing alcohol consumption for non-dependent drinkers hospitalized for an alcohol-related injury. Crisis theory indicates that an alcohol-related injury provides a teachable moment for clients to consider changing behavior. The sample consisted of 145 subjects, 115 (79%) males, 99 Caucasians, 46 African Americans with a mean age of 37 (+/-13.5). Subjects BAC on admission ranged from 0-400 with a mean of 133.68 (+/-123.16) and a mean GGT of 40.48 (+/- 55.42, range 0-404) and an Injury Severity Score of 7.80 (+/-5.65). The study used an experimental design with subject randomized to two experimental and one control group. Subjects were interviewed baseline, 1,3,6, and 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption. Across the 12 months all subjects decreased the number of binges per month from 9 to 3, decreased drinking days in a month from 14 to 9, decreased drinks per drinking day from 7 to 3 and increased their low risk drinking from 1.7 weeks a month to 2.6 weeks per month. For all subjects there was a dramatic decrease in drinking following the injury with a gradual increase in drinking, which did not return to pre-injury levels. Forty-four percent of subjects were abstinent for the entire year. Post injury subjects delayed their return to binge drinking by 5.5 months. There was not a significant difference on any of the drinking outcomes by experimental or control conditions. Thus it appears that the injury is of sufficient impact to motivate individuals to consider changing their drinking behavior. The injury may have triggered off the natural recovery process. Alternately, the frequent assessment of drinking behavior may have acted as an intervention in itself. Research supported by Grant 10355 National Institute for Alcohol abuse and Alcoholism.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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