2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160553
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexual Identity and Smoking: Are Lesbians at Greater Risk?
Abstract:
Sexual Identity and Smoking: Are Lesbians at Greater Risk?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hughes, Tonda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 956 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.5106
Healthy People 2010 designates sexual orientation as one of six categories in which health disparities exist, and states that some evidence suggests that lesbians have higher rates of smoking than heterosexual women. Despite the substantial increase in research on smoking among women during the past two decades, lesbians as a group have been largely ignored. Very few studies have collected data on smoking among lesbians and only one study included a comparison group of heterosexual women. To further examine smoking rates and risks for smoking among lesbians we conducted a secondary analysis of survey data collected from 550 lesbians and a comparison group of 270 heterosexual women in Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and New York City. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the relative contributions of sexual orientation, demographic characteristics, and interactions between sexual orientation and demographic characteristics in predicting current and past smoking, and smoking in response to stress. Although overall rates of current smoking and smoking in response to stress did not differ, the rate of lifetime smoking was higher among lesbians. African American lesbians were more likely than White lesbians and African American heterosexual women to be current smokers and to smoke in response to stress. Education was the most robust predictor of smoking and smoking in response to stress. The effects of sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and education appear to be additive - racial/ethnic minority lesbians with low levels of education were most likely to be current smokers, lifetime smokers, and to smoke in response to stress. Implications of these findings, especially those related to multiple marginalized statuses, will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexual Identity and Smoking: Are Lesbians at Greater Risk?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160553-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sexual Identity and Smoking: Are Lesbians at Greater Risk?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hughes, Tonda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 956 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.5106</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thughes@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Healthy People 2010 designates sexual orientation as one of six categories in which health disparities exist, and states that some evidence suggests that lesbians have higher rates of smoking than heterosexual women. Despite the substantial increase in research on smoking among women during the past two decades, lesbians as a group have been largely ignored. Very few studies have collected data on smoking among lesbians and only one study included a comparison group of heterosexual women. To further examine smoking rates and risks for smoking among lesbians we conducted a secondary analysis of survey data collected from 550 lesbians and a comparison group of 270 heterosexual women in Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and New York City. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the relative contributions of sexual orientation, demographic characteristics, and interactions between sexual orientation and demographic characteristics in predicting current and past smoking, and smoking in response to stress. Although overall rates of current smoking and smoking in response to stress did not differ, the rate of lifetime smoking was higher among lesbians. African American lesbians were more likely than White lesbians and African American heterosexual women to be current smokers and to smoke in response to stress. Education was the most robust predictor of smoking and smoking in response to stress. The effects of sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and education appear to be additive - racial/ethnic minority lesbians with low levels of education were most likely to be current smokers, lifetime smokers, and to smoke in response to stress. Implications of these findings, especially those related to multiple marginalized statuses, will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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