Community Assessment of Adolescent Women's Access to Reproductive Health Care Services in Rural Missouri Counties

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160556
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Assessment of Adolescent Women's Access to Reproductive Health Care Services in Rural Missouri Counties
Abstract:
Community Assessment of Adolescent Women's Access to Reproductive Health Care Services in Rural Missouri Counties
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Miller, Louise
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S303 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.884.9542
The purpose of this study was to examine health care access and social factors that may explain disparate birth rates among adolescent women in rural Missouri. Hongvivatana's access model and social capital concepts were used as the theoretical framework to guide assessment of factors affecting community health outcomes. A comparative field study was conducted with two pairs of rural Missouri counties. These counties were purposefully selected since state data demonstrated contrasting reproductive health outcomes (high versus low adolescent birth rates) between county pairs, even though these counties were not only geographically adjacent but had similar socio-economic indicators. In the four counties, face-to-face interview data were collected from adolescent women, health care providers, and key community informants to identify access and social factors that affect adolescent women's access to reproductive health services. From interview data, four access factors critical for accessing reproductive health services were confirmed: confidentiality, empathetic client-centered care, female care-givers, and reasonable cost. Since these four access factors were common to all four counties, differences in birth rates between the pairs were not explained. Of the five social themes that emerged: mother-daughter relationships, peer relationships, community stability, parent involvement/supervision, and adolescent life goals, three themes, community stability, parent involvement/supervision, and life goals, accounted for the differences between high and low birth rate county pairs. Assessment of community social factors is critical to explaining health care access concerns in selected populations. Social themes accounting for differences in county birth rates reflect the sociological concept of social capital, or the investment in the well-being of the community by its members . This study underscores the importance of assessing social capital when planning programs to affect community health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Assessment of Adolescent Women's Access to Reproductive Health Care Services in Rural Missouri Countiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160556-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Assessment of Adolescent Women's Access to Reproductive Health Care Services in Rural Missouri Counties</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Louise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S303 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.884.9542</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lmiller@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine health care access and social factors that may explain disparate birth rates among adolescent women in rural Missouri. Hongvivatana's access model and social capital concepts were used as the theoretical framework to guide assessment of factors affecting community health outcomes. A comparative field study was conducted with two pairs of rural Missouri counties. These counties were purposefully selected since state data demonstrated contrasting reproductive health outcomes (high versus low adolescent birth rates) between county pairs, even though these counties were not only geographically adjacent but had similar socio-economic indicators. In the four counties, face-to-face interview data were collected from adolescent women, health care providers, and key community informants to identify access and social factors that affect adolescent women's access to reproductive health services. From interview data, four access factors critical for accessing reproductive health services were confirmed: confidentiality, empathetic client-centered care, female care-givers, and reasonable cost. Since these four access factors were common to all four counties, differences in birth rates between the pairs were not explained. Of the five social themes that emerged: mother-daughter relationships, peer relationships, community stability, parent involvement/supervision, and adolescent life goals, three themes, community stability, parent involvement/supervision, and life goals, accounted for the differences between high and low birth rate county pairs. Assessment of community social factors is critical to explaining health care access concerns in selected populations. Social themes accounting for differences in county birth rates reflect the sociological concept of social capital, or the investment in the well-being of the community by its members . This study underscores the importance of assessing social capital when planning programs to affect community health outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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