Normal Weight and Overweight Women's Self-Talk Related to Overeating and Resisting Overeating

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160558
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Normal Weight and Overweight Women's Self-Talk Related to Overeating and Resisting Overeating
Abstract:
Normal Weight and Overweight Women's Self-Talk Related to Overeating and Resisting Overeating
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Popkess-Vawter, Sue
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913.588.3373
Extra body weight can be gained by habitually overeating in response to unpleasant thoughts and feelings and in celebrations. Self-talk, as defined in cognitive theory, is what people say to themselves about a particular situation based on contextual beliefs and attitudes. Self-talk determines emotional responses that lead to actions-here basic underlying beliefs behind the motivations for overeating in the absence of hunger (emotional eating). The purpose of this study was to contrast 45 normal weight and overweight women's self-talk surrounding overeating and resisting overeating situations. Motivational states for five points in time, as measured according to reversal theory tenets, were contrasted using chi square analyses for normal weight and overweight groups. Verbatim interview transcriptions were content analyzed using self-report of their self-talk for five points in time for all subjects and weight groups. Although little difference was found between groups in motivational states and self-talk themes, differences for all subjects in overeating situations were notably different from resisting situations. The dominant themes before desiring to overeat in overeating situations began with negative feeling states and stress from time pressure. In contrast, subjects' self-talk during resisting situations was focused primarily on task completion and time pressure, with almost no negative feelings expressed. The results of this study can provide guidance for individualized intervention strategies for overweight people by identifying self-talk related to overeating and resisting overeating. Awareness of what clients are telling themselves about their eating behaviors can form the basis for effective interventions that focus on the cause of overeating instead of the result.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNormal Weight and Overweight Women's Self-Talk Related to Overeating and Resisting Overeatingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160558-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Normal Weight and Overweight Women's Self-Talk Related to Overeating and Resisting Overeating</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Popkess-Vawter, Sue</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913.588.3373</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spopkess@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Extra body weight can be gained by habitually overeating in response to unpleasant thoughts and feelings and in celebrations. Self-talk, as defined in cognitive theory, is what people say to themselves about a particular situation based on contextual beliefs and attitudes. Self-talk determines emotional responses that lead to actions-here basic underlying beliefs behind the motivations for overeating in the absence of hunger (emotional eating). The purpose of this study was to contrast 45 normal weight and overweight women's self-talk surrounding overeating and resisting overeating situations. Motivational states for five points in time, as measured according to reversal theory tenets, were contrasted using chi square analyses for normal weight and overweight groups. Verbatim interview transcriptions were content analyzed using self-report of their self-talk for five points in time for all subjects and weight groups. Although little difference was found between groups in motivational states and self-talk themes, differences for all subjects in overeating situations were notably different from resisting situations. The dominant themes before desiring to overeat in overeating situations began with negative feeling states and stress from time pressure. In contrast, subjects' self-talk during resisting situations was focused primarily on task completion and time pressure, with almost no negative feelings expressed. The results of this study can provide guidance for individualized intervention strategies for overweight people by identifying self-talk related to overeating and resisting overeating. Awareness of what clients are telling themselves about their eating behaviors can form the basis for effective interventions that focus on the cause of overeating instead of the result.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.