Screening for Psychosocial Health in Pregnancy: Differences between a Medicaid Managed Care Group and a Privately Insured Group in Appalachia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160562
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Screening for Psychosocial Health in Pregnancy: Differences between a Medicaid Managed Care Group and a Privately Insured Group in Appalachia
Abstract:
Screening for Psychosocial Health in Pregnancy: Differences between a Medicaid Managed Care Group and a Privately Insured Group in Appalachia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Jesse, Darlene
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.9248
Effective and early identification of a woman's psychosocial health is particularly important in pregnancy because the welfare of the mother and the fetus could be jeopardized. Prediction of adverse birth outcomes has been greater when psychosocial as well as biophysical risk factors in pregnancy were considered. Yet the scope of risk assessment has been limited to biophysical and socio-demographic factors and few providers routinely screen for psychosocial risks in pregnancy. In addition, the special psychosocial needs of historically under-served pregnant women are often neglected in the fast paced climate of Medicaid Managed Care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the differences in psychosocial risks among women enrolled in TennCare, a Medicaid Managed Care Plan, and women privately insured in East Tennessee. This study was part of a larger study that was guided by key concepts from Watson's Theory of Care. Face to face interviews were conducted using standard and reliable questionnaires with a convenience sample of 120 pregnant women between 14-44 years and 16-28 weeks gestation, at three prenatal clinics in East Tennessee. Chi square tests and t-test statistical methods were used to determine differences between the two insurance groups' level of education, biophysical risks, stress, social support, depression, abuse, attitude towards pregnancy, smoking, and substance use. Depression, abuse, and smoking were significantly higher (p <.05) among women in the TennCare group than in the privately insured group. Pregnancy provides a "window of opportunity" for midwives and nurses to design prenatal assessments and develop evidenced based psychosocial interventions that could improve maternal and infant health for this vulnerable group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleScreening for Psychosocial Health in Pregnancy: Differences between a Medicaid Managed Care Group and a Privately Insured Group in Appalachiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160562-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Screening for Psychosocial Health in Pregnancy: Differences between a Medicaid Managed Care Group and a Privately Insured Group in Appalachia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jesse, Darlene</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.9248</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejesse@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Effective and early identification of a woman's psychosocial health is particularly important in pregnancy because the welfare of the mother and the fetus could be jeopardized. Prediction of adverse birth outcomes has been greater when psychosocial as well as biophysical risk factors in pregnancy were considered. Yet the scope of risk assessment has been limited to biophysical and socio-demographic factors and few providers routinely screen for psychosocial risks in pregnancy. In addition, the special psychosocial needs of historically under-served pregnant women are often neglected in the fast paced climate of Medicaid Managed Care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the differences in psychosocial risks among women enrolled in TennCare, a Medicaid Managed Care Plan, and women privately insured in East Tennessee. This study was part of a larger study that was guided by key concepts from Watson's Theory of Care. Face to face interviews were conducted using standard and reliable questionnaires with a convenience sample of 120 pregnant women between 14-44 years and 16-28 weeks gestation, at three prenatal clinics in East Tennessee. Chi square tests and t-test statistical methods were used to determine differences between the two insurance groups' level of education, biophysical risks, stress, social support, depression, abuse, attitude towards pregnancy, smoking, and substance use. Depression, abuse, and smoking were significantly higher (p &lt;.05) among women in the TennCare group than in the privately insured group. Pregnancy provides a &quot;window of opportunity&quot; for midwives and nurses to design prenatal assessments and develop evidenced based psychosocial interventions that could improve maternal and infant health for this vulnerable group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.