2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160564
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Experience of Combined Breastfeeding and Working
Abstract:
Women's Experience of Combined Breastfeeding and Working
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Kansas City
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, 219 Health Sciences Building, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816.235.1700
The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding experience as expressed by working women who returned to work after childbirth. This study was part of a clinical control trial to determine the effects of a prenatal education on breastfeeding duration. Qualitative data relevant to situations and difficulties from 50 women who continued breastfeeding and returned to work by 16 weeks postpartum were analyzed. Using sementic content analysis, 3 procedures were used: coding data, categorizing text units, and refining the emerging themes. Four categories which emerged from the data were support, attitude, strategic plan, and psychological distress. Support expressed by women who combined breastfeeding and working in this study include (a) accepting environment, (b) spatial issues, (c) modeling, and (d) time allowance. Women expressed the need to maintain a positive attitude so that they could commit to and accomplish their breastfeeding goals. A strategic plan was described as a method to help prevent breastfeeding problems as well as managing to continue breastfeeding successfully. This category reflects an organized plan that the woman develops to aid her in the transitional process of combining breastfeeding and working before and after returning to work. Finally, psychological distress emerged as a conflict between the demands of work and the breastfeeding process. These feelings may include guilt, stress, or having to sacrifice. These findings demonstrated that support, a positive attitude, and a strategic plan were essential elements for women who continued breastfeeding while employed. However, some mothers may experience psychological distress. Nurses and health professionals should provide anticipatory guidance to women who plan to continue breastfeeding after returning to work. Further research should investigate the advantages for both employers and employees in relation to breastfeeding promotion in the workplace.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Experience of Combined Breastfeeding and Workingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160564-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Experience of Combined Breastfeeding and Working</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, 219 Health Sciences Building, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816.235.1700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rojjanasriratw@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding experience as expressed by working women who returned to work after childbirth. This study was part of a clinical control trial to determine the effects of a prenatal education on breastfeeding duration. Qualitative data relevant to situations and difficulties from 50 women who continued breastfeeding and returned to work by 16 weeks postpartum were analyzed. Using sementic content analysis, 3 procedures were used: coding data, categorizing text units, and refining the emerging themes. Four categories which emerged from the data were support, attitude, strategic plan, and psychological distress. Support expressed by women who combined breastfeeding and working in this study include (a) accepting environment, (b) spatial issues, (c) modeling, and (d) time allowance. Women expressed the need to maintain a positive attitude so that they could commit to and accomplish their breastfeeding goals. A strategic plan was described as a method to help prevent breastfeeding problems as well as managing to continue breastfeeding successfully. This category reflects an organized plan that the woman develops to aid her in the transitional process of combining breastfeeding and working before and after returning to work. Finally, psychological distress emerged as a conflict between the demands of work and the breastfeeding process. These feelings may include guilt, stress, or having to sacrifice. These findings demonstrated that support, a positive attitude, and a strategic plan were essential elements for women who continued breastfeeding while employed. However, some mothers may experience psychological distress. Nurses and health professionals should provide anticipatory guidance to women who plan to continue breastfeeding after returning to work. Further research should investigate the advantages for both employers and employees in relation to breastfeeding promotion in the workplace.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:03:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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