2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160566
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Over-the-Counter Drug Use among Adolescents
Abstract:
Over-the-Counter Drug Use among Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hope, Kathryn, MA/AM
P.I. Institution Name:Southwest Missouri State University
Title:Head
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 304 Professional Building, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA
Contact Telephone:417.836.5310
Purpose: Although extensive studies have examined illicit drug use in adolescents, little is known about adolescent use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. The study objectives were: to describe the prevalence and types of OTC drug use by adolescents, and the relationship of OTC drug use to antecedent factors. Framework: Social Learning Theory provided a framework for examination of adolescent OTC drug use and its relationship to social influences and knowledge. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 67 Midwestern, high school students was done using a self-report questionnaire with established validity and reliability. Descriptive and correlational data analysis methods were used. Results: The most frequent drugs used were ibuprofen (92%), acetaminophen (89%), aspirin (62%), ephedrine (14%), caffeine tablets (22%), sleeping pills (16%) and laxatives (4%). Pain relievers and ephedrine had the highest frequencies of recent use. Significant social factors related to OTC drug use were friends' influence on the most caffeine ever used and friends' approval of shorter intervals between doses of pain relievers. The younger the subjects were when they started using OTC drugs, the less aware parents were about their use. Subjects who waited less time between doses of pain reliever, used more than directed, or reported a higher dose as the most ever taken, believed that more pain reliever worked quicker, that it was OK to take more than directed, or that OTC pain relievers couldn't hurt them. The relationship between social influence and knowledge, and the adolescents' OTC drug use was evident for use of cough syrups and pain relievers. Conclusions: More information is needed about patterns of OTC drug use among adolescents. Health care providers, health educators, and parents can use this knowledge to make decisions about teaching adolescents safe use of OTC drugs, as they become independent decision makers about their own use of OTC drugs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOver-the-Counter Drug Use among Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160566-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Over-the-Counter Drug Use among Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hope, Kathryn, MA/AM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southwest Missouri State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Head</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 304 Professional Building, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417.836.5310</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klh895f@smsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Although extensive studies have examined illicit drug use in adolescents, little is known about adolescent use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. The study objectives were: to describe the prevalence and types of OTC drug use by adolescents, and the relationship of OTC drug use to antecedent factors. Framework: Social Learning Theory provided a framework for examination of adolescent OTC drug use and its relationship to social influences and knowledge. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 67 Midwestern, high school students was done using a self-report questionnaire with established validity and reliability. Descriptive and correlational data analysis methods were used. Results: The most frequent drugs used were ibuprofen (92%), acetaminophen (89%), aspirin (62%), ephedrine (14%), caffeine tablets (22%), sleeping pills (16%) and laxatives (4%). Pain relievers and ephedrine had the highest frequencies of recent use. Significant social factors related to OTC drug use were friends' influence on the most caffeine ever used and friends' approval of shorter intervals between doses of pain relievers. The younger the subjects were when they started using OTC drugs, the less aware parents were about their use. Subjects who waited less time between doses of pain reliever, used more than directed, or reported a higher dose as the most ever taken, believed that more pain reliever worked quicker, that it was OK to take more than directed, or that OTC pain relievers couldn't hurt them. The relationship between social influence and knowledge, and the adolescents' OTC drug use was evident for use of cough syrups and pain relievers. Conclusions: More information is needed about patterns of OTC drug use among adolescents. Health care providers, health educators, and parents can use this knowledge to make decisions about teaching adolescents safe use of OTC drugs, as they become independent decision makers about their own use of OTC drugs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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