2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast Cancer Screening Practices among Taiwanese Immigrant Women
Abstract:
Breast Cancer Screening Practices among Taiwanese Immigrant Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hsu, Chi-Ho
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Although breast cancer rates among Asian-Americans are lower than those for US Whites (73 versus 113 per 100,000 in incidence rate; 11 versus 26 per 100,000 in mortality rate), they are higher than rates in Asia. In particular, immigrants are not regularly participating in early detection programs. Researchers suggest that westernized lifestyles impact on breast cancer risk for US Asian immigrant women. The National Cancer Institute urges the conduct of behavioral research to determine how best to attract women into prevention trials and how to ensure their compliance with prevention recommendations. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among acculturation, access factors, health beliefs, selected social-demographic characteristics, and the behaviors related to breast cancer screening in Taiwanese immigrant women using a survey research design. Women who were 40 and older, first generation immigrants, without diagnosed breast cancer were contacted through on-site presentations and snowball sampling in the metropolitan Chicago area. Questionnaires and a 3rd-week follow-up reminder were mailed to the women who volunteered to be in the study and to potential participants that they recommended. A total of 687 volunteers agreed to be in the study and 381 (55%) questionnaires were returned. Preliminary findings indicated that the majority of these women did have at least one BSE, CBE, and mammogram in the past. However, these women began participating in early detection programs in their late 30s to early 40s and they varied in their practice of regular BSE (28%), CBE (59%), and mammogram (64%). On-going data analysis includes bivariate correlation and multivariate logistic regression modeling as well as the evaluation on the psychometric properties of the study instruments. The study results will be used to describe screening adherence in Asian immigrant women and suggest intervention guidelines for further study with these women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast Cancer Screening Practices among Taiwanese Immigrant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breast Cancer Screening Practices among Taiwanese Immigrant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsu, Chi-Ho</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although breast cancer rates among Asian-Americans are lower than those for US Whites (73 versus 113 per 100,000 in incidence rate; 11 versus 26 per 100,000 in mortality rate), they are higher than rates in Asia. In particular, immigrants are not regularly participating in early detection programs. Researchers suggest that westernized lifestyles impact on breast cancer risk for US Asian immigrant women. The National Cancer Institute urges the conduct of behavioral research to determine how best to attract women into prevention trials and how to ensure their compliance with prevention recommendations. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among acculturation, access factors, health beliefs, selected social-demographic characteristics, and the behaviors related to breast cancer screening in Taiwanese immigrant women using a survey research design. Women who were 40 and older, first generation immigrants, without diagnosed breast cancer were contacted through on-site presentations and snowball sampling in the metropolitan Chicago area. Questionnaires and a 3rd-week follow-up reminder were mailed to the women who volunteered to be in the study and to potential participants that they recommended. A total of 687 volunteers agreed to be in the study and 381 (55%) questionnaires were returned. Preliminary findings indicated that the majority of these women did have at least one BSE, CBE, and mammogram in the past. However, these women began participating in early detection programs in their late 30s to early 40s and they varied in their practice of regular BSE (28%), CBE (59%), and mammogram (64%). On-going data analysis includes bivariate correlation and multivariate logistic regression modeling as well as the evaluation on the psychometric properties of the study instruments. The study results will be used to describe screening adherence in Asian immigrant women and suggest intervention guidelines for further study with these women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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