2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160569
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perspectives of African American Women on General Health and Breast Cancer Risk
Abstract:
Perspectives of African American Women on General Health and Breast Cancer Risk
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Buchholz, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:College of Nursing
Title:Wayne State University
Contact Address:112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
This study examined how African American Women (AAW) perceive general health risk, breast cancer risk, communication of health risk, and interest in using interventions to reduce risk of breast cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that among properly selected women, Tamoxifen use for five years can reduce a woman's risk of developing breast cancer by almost half. However, there is a lack of literature that examines how AAW who are at low-risk for breast cancer view the use of Tamoxifen as a prophylactic pharmacological agent. Recruitment of subjects was accomplished by sending out letters to women from two primary care clinics at a large urban teaching facility, as well as placing flyers at two clinics of a local cancer institute. AAW who were 40 to 65 years old, had a negative family history of breast cancer, and had no past breast biopsy were eligible. Three focus groups (N=33) were conducted by two Nurse Practitioners and a research assistant. During the session, educational handouts were provided regarding breast cancer, risk and prevention. Participants were asked about their perceptions of general health risk and breast cancer risk, how they understood numbers related to risk, and about Tamoxifen use. Several major themes were identified. In general, women were concerned about health risk now and over their lifetime. A risk of 3% was generally considered low. Risk was typically thought of on an individual basis, and not as part of a group of people. Because of the side effects of Tamoxifen, use of the drug was regarded as very serious and only to be used after careful decision making. Information collected from these focus groups provides an opportunity for primary health care providers to learn how to better deliver breast cancer risk assessments and counseling to AAW.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerspectives of African American Women on General Health and Breast Cancer Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160569-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perspectives of African American Women on General Health and Breast Cancer Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchholz, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aa4738@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined how African American Women (AAW) perceive general health risk, breast cancer risk, communication of health risk, and interest in using interventions to reduce risk of breast cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that among properly selected women, Tamoxifen use for five years can reduce a woman's risk of developing breast cancer by almost half. However, there is a lack of literature that examines how AAW who are at low-risk for breast cancer view the use of Tamoxifen as a prophylactic pharmacological agent. Recruitment of subjects was accomplished by sending out letters to women from two primary care clinics at a large urban teaching facility, as well as placing flyers at two clinics of a local cancer institute. AAW who were 40 to 65 years old, had a negative family history of breast cancer, and had no past breast biopsy were eligible. Three focus groups (N=33) were conducted by two Nurse Practitioners and a research assistant. During the session, educational handouts were provided regarding breast cancer, risk and prevention. Participants were asked about their perceptions of general health risk and breast cancer risk, how they understood numbers related to risk, and about Tamoxifen use. Several major themes were identified. In general, women were concerned about health risk now and over their lifetime. A risk of 3% was generally considered low. Risk was typically thought of on an individual basis, and not as part of a group of people. Because of the side effects of Tamoxifen, use of the drug was regarded as very serious and only to be used after careful decision making. Information collected from these focus groups provides an opportunity for primary health care providers to learn how to better deliver breast cancer risk assessments and counseling to AAW.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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