2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160574
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Why Listen to Bowel Sounds?
Abstract:
Why Listen to Bowel Sounds?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Cullen, Laura
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Title:Advanced Practice Nurse
Contact Address:200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Purpose: This paper presents the evidence for assessing gastrointestinal (GI) motility following surgery in adults. Conceptual Framework: The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice provided the guiding framework for this project. Methods: Printed evidence, including research, was located via Ovid searches of CINAHL, Medline and electronic searches of evidence-based practice web sites such as the Cochrane Libraries, AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse, and Joanna Briggs Institute. Key search terms used were postoperative complications, postoperative care, bowel sounds, gastrointestinal motility, digestive system surgical procedures, physiologic ileus, ileal motility, surgery, assessment, postoperative, postoperative paralytic ileus, ileal motility, and ileal surgery. No existing evidence-based nursing practice guidelines were located. Thirty studies were critiqued, the type of evidence identified, and recommendations for practice set forth and graded. Results: Auscultation of bowel sounds was first proposed in 1905, and became a nursing practice based upon tradition rather than scientific evidence or understanding of GI motility. Published research is sparse, sporadic, and dates to the 1960's. Research, expert opinion, and case studies report use of bowel sounds only as a matter of tradition. Evidence suggests that return of motility in the colon is an essential step for patient progression after abdominal surgery. In contrast, return of bowel sounds represents early, uncoordinated contraction within the small intestine, and not coordinated propulsive contraction of the colon. Despite routine use of bowel sound assessment, evidence to support this practice in adult postoperative, abdominal surgical patients is limited. Conclusion: Routine bowel sound assessment is a ritualized nursing practice with limited empirical evidence to support its use in adult, postoperative, abdominal surgical patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhy Listen to Bowel Sounds?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160574-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Why Listen to Bowel Sounds?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cullen, Laura</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Advanced Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This paper presents the evidence for assessing gastrointestinal (GI) motility following surgery in adults. Conceptual Framework: The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice provided the guiding framework for this project. Methods: Printed evidence, including research, was located via Ovid searches of CINAHL, Medline and electronic searches of evidence-based practice web sites such as the Cochrane Libraries, AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse, and Joanna Briggs Institute. Key search terms used were postoperative complications, postoperative care, bowel sounds, gastrointestinal motility, digestive system surgical procedures, physiologic ileus, ileal motility, surgery, assessment, postoperative, postoperative paralytic ileus, ileal motility, and ileal surgery. No existing evidence-based nursing practice guidelines were located. Thirty studies were critiqued, the type of evidence identified, and recommendations for practice set forth and graded. Results: Auscultation of bowel sounds was first proposed in 1905, and became a nursing practice based upon tradition rather than scientific evidence or understanding of GI motility. Published research is sparse, sporadic, and dates to the 1960's. Research, expert opinion, and case studies report use of bowel sounds only as a matter of tradition. Evidence suggests that return of motility in the colon is an essential step for patient progression after abdominal surgery. In contrast, return of bowel sounds represents early, uncoordinated contraction within the small intestine, and not coordinated propulsive contraction of the colon. Despite routine use of bowel sound assessment, evidence to support this practice in adult postoperative, abdominal surgical patients is limited. Conclusion: Routine bowel sound assessment is a ritualized nursing practice with limited empirical evidence to support its use in adult, postoperative, abdominal surgical patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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