2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160576
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relation of the Community, Neighborhood, and Physical Activity in Women
Abstract:
Relation of the Community, Neighborhood, and Physical Activity in Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Nies, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 319 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4135
Participation in physical activity on a regular basis is very important to overall health. However, the environment a person lives in can play a large role in determining whether or not they exercise. Variables like crime rate, weather, and available resources can all influence a persons activity level. The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity level of women living in either a southern or a northern region of the United States. Sedentary women were recruited to be part of a program designed to increase walking. The sample included 118 women from a southern city and 195 women from a northern city. All women were between the ages of 30 and 60. Fifty five percent of the sample was African American and 45% was European American. Women were measured on the time it took to walk one mile, lung capacity, BMI, percent body fat, self reported activity and mood. Measures were taken at baseline and again at six months. Regional groups differed significantly on baseline measures (F(6, 302)=26.41, p<.01). Women from the northern city took longer to walk a mile, had a higher BMI, higher percent body fat, lower lung capacity, and less self reported physical activity. These findings remained significant after controlling for racial differences. Women from the northern region showed greater improvement on time to walk a mile (F(1, 192)=9.50, p<.01) and percent body fat at six months (F(1,192)=36.49, p<.001). Across both regional groups, women who reported living in a neighborhood with convenient places to walk scored better on physical fitness measures at baseline (F(6, 299)=2.71, p<.05). Awareness about the relation community and neighborhood has with physical activity can be useful for designing fitness programs that are sensitive to environmental differences. Differences in one's community and neighborhood setting can add barriers or incentives for exercise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelation of the Community, Neighborhood, and Physical Activity in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160576-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relation of the Community, Neighborhood, and Physical Activity in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nies, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 319 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4135</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.nies@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Participation in physical activity on a regular basis is very important to overall health. However, the environment a person lives in can play a large role in determining whether or not they exercise. Variables like crime rate, weather, and available resources can all influence a persons activity level. The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity level of women living in either a southern or a northern region of the United States. Sedentary women were recruited to be part of a program designed to increase walking. The sample included 118 women from a southern city and 195 women from a northern city. All women were between the ages of 30 and 60. Fifty five percent of the sample was African American and 45% was European American. Women were measured on the time it took to walk one mile, lung capacity, BMI, percent body fat, self reported activity and mood. Measures were taken at baseline and again at six months. Regional groups differed significantly on baseline measures (F(6, 302)=26.41, p&lt;.01). Women from the northern city took longer to walk a mile, had a higher BMI, higher percent body fat, lower lung capacity, and less self reported physical activity. These findings remained significant after controlling for racial differences. Women from the northern region showed greater improvement on time to walk a mile (F(1, 192)=9.50, p&lt;.01) and percent body fat at six months (F(1,192)=36.49, p&lt;.001). Across both regional groups, women who reported living in a neighborhood with convenient places to walk scored better on physical fitness measures at baseline (F(6, 299)=2.71, p&lt;.05). Awareness about the relation community and neighborhood has with physical activity can be useful for designing fitness programs that are sensitive to environmental differences. Differences in one's community and neighborhood setting can add barriers or incentives for exercise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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