2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160577
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stamina and Vitality of HIV-Infected Women
Abstract:
Stamina and Vitality of HIV-Infected Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Stevens, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 566, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5817
In this presentation we share findings from a longitudinal study of 55 women living with HIV/AIDS. In multiple qualitative interviews with each participant over a two-year period we have pursued an in-depth understanding of their everyday lives and health needs over time. The state wide sample reflects the diversity of women infected with HIV in Wisconsin. The sample is predominantly African American (53%), 36% are Caucasian, 7% are Hispanic and 4% are Native American. The majority of the women (71%) contracted HIV through heterosexual sexual contact, 11% through injection drug use, 11% through a combination of both, and 7% through other sources such as blood transfusion or tattoo. The majority of the sample (75%) resides within one major metropolitan area while the remainder comes from others areas within the state of Wisconsin. The mean age of the sample is 41(SD 6.6) and the mean income $11,337 (SD $6,507). Each women participated in up to ten 2-hour semi-structured interviews about the meaning and impact of HIV/AIDS for her and her family, symptom experiences, capacity to initiate and adhere to treatment regimens, capacity to reduce risky sexual and substance use behaviors, and experiences accessing health care and social services resources. Transcripts from this large qualitative database have been managed using N-VIVO software. A multi-stage narrative analysis has been the primary analytic approach. Our findings explain the stamina and vitality these women bring to everyday circumstances in which they face complex social, economic, and physical obstacles. Our goal in this work is to contribute to the recognition of the strengths of these women so that health care and social services can be planned from a capacity-building perspective that takes into account real-life situations of HIV-infected women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStamina and Vitality of HIV-Infected Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160577-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stamina and Vitality of HIV-Infected Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 566, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5817</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pstevens@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In this presentation we share findings from a longitudinal study of 55 women living with HIV/AIDS. In multiple qualitative interviews with each participant over a two-year period we have pursued an in-depth understanding of their everyday lives and health needs over time. The state wide sample reflects the diversity of women infected with HIV in Wisconsin. The sample is predominantly African American (53%), 36% are Caucasian, 7% are Hispanic and 4% are Native American. The majority of the women (71%) contracted HIV through heterosexual sexual contact, 11% through injection drug use, 11% through a combination of both, and 7% through other sources such as blood transfusion or tattoo. The majority of the sample (75%) resides within one major metropolitan area while the remainder comes from others areas within the state of Wisconsin. The mean age of the sample is 41(SD 6.6) and the mean income $11,337 (SD $6,507). Each women participated in up to ten 2-hour semi-structured interviews about the meaning and impact of HIV/AIDS for her and her family, symptom experiences, capacity to initiate and adhere to treatment regimens, capacity to reduce risky sexual and substance use behaviors, and experiences accessing health care and social services resources. Transcripts from this large qualitative database have been managed using N-VIVO software. A multi-stage narrative analysis has been the primary analytic approach. Our findings explain the stamina and vitality these women bring to everyday circumstances in which they face complex social, economic, and physical obstacles. Our goal in this work is to contribute to the recognition of the strengths of these women so that health care and social services can be planned from a capacity-building perspective that takes into account real-life situations of HIV-infected women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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