2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160578
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Polestriding Exercise and Vitamin E for Management of Claudication Pain
Abstract:
Polestriding Exercise and Vitamin E for Management of Claudication Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Collins, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Edward Hines Jr., VA Hospital
Title:Research Nurse Scientist
Contact Address:5th & Roosevelt Road, PO Box 5000, Hines, IL, 60141, USA
Contact Telephone:708.202.8387
Purpose: The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to determine the efficacy of polestriding (PS) exercise (walking with poles in a movement similar to cross-country skiing) and/or vitamin E (Vit E) to increase exercise tolerance and improve quality of life (QOL) in persons with intermittent claudication. Theoretical Framework: Nagi Disability Model. Sample: Fifty-two subjects were randomized into four groups: polestriding and vitamin E (PS+Vit E, n=13); polestriding and placebo (PS+placebo, n=12); vitamin E without exercise (VitE, n=13), placebo without exercise (placebo, n=14). Subjects were primarily male, age=67±8 yr, resting ankle-brachial index of 0.66±0.18. Methods: Intervention: Subjects trained three times weekly for 24 weeks using individualized PS prescriptions for exercise. Assessment: Symptom-limited ramp treadmill test (TMT), constant work-rate TMT, ankle-brachial indices and a QOL battery were performed at baseline and selected time periods through six-months. Results: Persons in the PS+VitE group improved their walking duration by 20.7±15.6 min (266%), PS+placebo improved by 16.3±16.3 min (129%), VitE improved by 0.5±8 min (5%) and Placebo decreased by 1.5 ± 4.8 min (-14%). A significant PS effect was found (P < 0.001, effect but there was no significant effect of VitE or an interaction. A significant decline in the slope of perceived leg pain over time was realized from baseline to 6 months in both exercising groups (P=0.004) and no significant change was found in the non-exercising groups. Significant improvement over time was found in the PS groups on the physical function subscale of the SF-36 (P=0.027) and walking distance (P<0.001) and walking speed (P=0.02) subscales of the Walking Impairment Questionnaire. Conclusion: A moderate intensity PS program results in significant improvement in exercise tolerance, perceived physical function, walking distance and walking speed. In this study, VitE did not contribute to improvement in these parameters.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePolestriding Exercise and Vitamin E for Management of Claudication Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160578-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Polestriding Exercise and Vitamin E for Management of Claudication Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Collins, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Edward Hines Jr., VA Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Nurse Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5th &amp; Roosevelt Road, PO Box 5000, Hines, IL, 60141, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708.202.8387</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eileen.collins@med.va.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to determine the efficacy of polestriding (PS) exercise (walking with poles in a movement similar to cross-country skiing) and/or vitamin E (Vit E) to increase exercise tolerance and improve quality of life (QOL) in persons with intermittent claudication. Theoretical Framework: Nagi Disability Model. Sample: Fifty-two subjects were randomized into four groups: polestriding and vitamin E (PS+Vit E, n=13); polestriding and placebo (PS+placebo, n=12); vitamin E without exercise (VitE, n=13), placebo without exercise (placebo, n=14). Subjects were primarily male, age=67&plusmn;8 yr, resting ankle-brachial index of 0.66&plusmn;0.18. Methods: Intervention: Subjects trained three times weekly for 24 weeks using individualized PS prescriptions for exercise. Assessment: Symptom-limited ramp treadmill test (TMT), constant work-rate TMT, ankle-brachial indices and a QOL battery were performed at baseline and selected time periods through six-months. Results: Persons in the PS+VitE group improved their walking duration by 20.7&plusmn;15.6 min (266%), PS+placebo improved by 16.3&plusmn;16.3 min (129%), VitE improved by 0.5&plusmn;8 min (5%) and Placebo decreased by 1.5 &plusmn; 4.8 min (-14%). A significant PS effect was found (P &lt; 0.001, effect but there was no significant effect of VitE or an interaction. A significant decline in the slope of perceived leg pain over time was realized from baseline to 6 months in both exercising groups (P=0.004) and no significant change was found in the non-exercising groups. Significant improvement over time was found in the PS groups on the physical function subscale of the SF-36 (P=0.027) and walking distance (P&lt;0.001) and walking speed (P=0.02) subscales of the Walking Impairment Questionnaire. Conclusion: A moderate intensity PS program results in significant improvement in exercise tolerance, perceived physical function, walking distance and walking speed. In this study, VitE did not contribute to improvement in these parameters. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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