2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160580
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Management Decision Influences in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Self-Management Decision Influences in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hicks, Frank, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:7735083303
Self-management decision making places significant cognitive demands on individuals with heart failure (HF). Before theoretically valid decision supports can be developed for these individuals, a better understanding of underlying decision characteristics is needed. Although patients are influenced by a variety of sources when making health care decisions, these remain unclear in the heart failure population. To address this gap in knowledge, the Heart Failure Decision Influence Inventory (HFDII) was developed from an extensive review of the patient decision making and health belief literatures. The HFDII assesses the degree of influence on self-management decision making from five broad areas: Task difficulty, therapeutic value, information sources, symptoms, and personal beliefs and values. This pilot study describes sources of self-management decision influences for a group of 38 individuals with varying levels of heart failure (NYHA class II - IV). Therapeutic value was the most influential source of self-management decision making for these patients, followed by personal beliefs and values, information sources, symptom influence, and task difficulty across all NYHA classes. Symptom influence was least influential for persons with Class II HF, while task difficulty was least influential for those with Class III and IV HF. There were moderate and significant associations among information sources and personal beliefs and values, and information sources and symptom influence. Examination of individual items within each scale across NYHA class showed a trend toward fewer decision influences as the disease progressed, especially in the task difficulty scale. The HFDII exhibited strong content validity and internal consistency, but further studies need to examine construct validity of this tool, and to assess the utility of the HFDII in constructing useful patient decision supports.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Management Decision Influences in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160580-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Management Decision Influences in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hicks, Frank, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">7735083303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fhicks@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-management decision making places significant cognitive demands on individuals with heart failure (HF). Before theoretically valid decision supports can be developed for these individuals, a better understanding of underlying decision characteristics is needed. Although patients are influenced by a variety of sources when making health care decisions, these remain unclear in the heart failure population. To address this gap in knowledge, the Heart Failure Decision Influence Inventory (HFDII) was developed from an extensive review of the patient decision making and health belief literatures. The HFDII assesses the degree of influence on self-management decision making from five broad areas: Task difficulty, therapeutic value, information sources, symptoms, and personal beliefs and values. This pilot study describes sources of self-management decision influences for a group of 38 individuals with varying levels of heart failure (NYHA class II - IV). Therapeutic value was the most influential source of self-management decision making for these patients, followed by personal beliefs and values, information sources, symptom influence, and task difficulty across all NYHA classes. Symptom influence was least influential for persons with Class II HF, while task difficulty was least influential for those with Class III and IV HF. There were moderate and significant associations among information sources and personal beliefs and values, and information sources and symptom influence. Examination of individual items within each scale across NYHA class showed a trend toward fewer decision influences as the disease progressed, especially in the task difficulty scale. The HFDII exhibited strong content validity and internal consistency, but further studies need to examine construct validity of this tool, and to assess the utility of the HFDII in constructing useful patient decision supports.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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