2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160583
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (Scas): Comparison of Three Racial Groups
Abstract:
Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (Scas): Comparison of Three Racial Groups
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Mood, Darlene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Sr. Res. Scientist
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4169
Cultural diversity increasingly appears as a variable in nursing research, often measured by race/ethnicity. Most investigators agree, however, that, theoretically and conceptually, cultural diversity has more to do with shared beliefs, values, and traditions than skin color or language. The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare responses to the 13-item Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) by Caucasians (n=275), African-Americans (n=290), and a new sample of Chinese women (n=108); (2) compare psychometric properties of the SCAS across the three racial groups; and (3) examine differences among self-identified cultural groups within racial groups. Highly significant differences were found when comparing the mean SCAS scores of Caucasians (M=12.12), African-Americans (M=20.00), and Chinese (M=28.04), ps<. 001. Internal consistency reliability of the Chinese SCAS scores was high (.84), and comparable to that of the Caucasians (.86) and African-Americans (.80). Concurrent validity, tested by correlating SCAS scores with a single global item, was highest for Caucasians (r=.67) and lower for African-Americans (r=.36) and Chinese participants (r=.28). However, correlations of the SCAS with other study variables strongly supported the construct validity. Factor analysis within racial groups also revealed comparable factor structures. Earlier reports of the development of the SCAS in Caucasians and African-Americans demonstrated that significant differences existed among self-identified cultural groups within a single racial group (Caucasians), in addition to differences between racial groups. Chinese respondents described themselves as Chinese, Taiwanese, or Chinese-American, providing another racially homogeneous, but culturally heterogeneous, sample. Chinese women tended to have higher SCAS scores than Taiwanese women, p=.06, and significantly higher scores than Chinese-American women, p=.001. Taiwanese and Chinese-American women did not differ. Thus, the SCAS is psychometrically sound, and more fully differentiates cultural diversity within racial groups. (Supported by NCI grants R01CA59013 [Mood] and R03CA86594 [Yu].)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (Scas): Comparison of Three Racial Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160583-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (Scas): Comparison of Three Racial Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mood, Darlene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Sr. Res. Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmood@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cultural diversity increasingly appears as a variable in nursing research, often measured by race/ethnicity. Most investigators agree, however, that, theoretically and conceptually, cultural diversity has more to do with shared beliefs, values, and traditions than skin color or language. The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare responses to the 13-item Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) by Caucasians (n=275), African-Americans (n=290), and a new sample of Chinese women (n=108); (2) compare psychometric properties of the SCAS across the three racial groups; and (3) examine differences among self-identified cultural groups within racial groups. Highly significant differences were found when comparing the mean SCAS scores of Caucasians (M=12.12), African-Americans (M=20.00), and Chinese (M=28.04), ps&lt;. 001. Internal consistency reliability of the Chinese SCAS scores was high (.84), and comparable to that of the Caucasians (.86) and African-Americans (.80). Concurrent validity, tested by correlating SCAS scores with a single global item, was highest for Caucasians (r=.67) and lower for African-Americans (r=.36) and Chinese participants (r=.28). However, correlations of the SCAS with other study variables strongly supported the construct validity. Factor analysis within racial groups also revealed comparable factor structures. Earlier reports of the development of the SCAS in Caucasians and African-Americans demonstrated that significant differences existed among self-identified cultural groups within a single racial group (Caucasians), in addition to differences between racial groups. Chinese respondents described themselves as Chinese, Taiwanese, or Chinese-American, providing another racially homogeneous, but culturally heterogeneous, sample. Chinese women tended to have higher SCAS scores than Taiwanese women, p=.06, and significantly higher scores than Chinese-American women, p=.001. Taiwanese and Chinese-American women did not differ. Thus, the SCAS is psychometrically sound, and more fully differentiates cultural diversity within racial groups. (Supported by NCI grants R01CA59013 [Mood] and R03CA86594 [Yu].)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:04:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:04:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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