2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital Nurses' Occupational Safety
Abstract:
Hospital Nurses' Occupational Safety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Blegen, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Science Center
Title:Professor & Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4200 East 9th Avenue, C288-04, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303.315.4237
Nurses' occupational safety, particularly back injuries and exposure to body fluids and blood borne pathogens, is of major concern. In the last 15 years, with the burgeoning problem of blood borne disease, there has been a specific emphasis on Standard precautions and the immediate reporting of needlesticks and other exposures to body fluids. Non-compliance with the precautions is a major issue as is the reporting of exposures. Research studies have focused on compliance with Standard Precautions; but, few studies have examined the reporting rate. The purpose of this study was to describe the rate of occupational injuries (back injuries and exposure to body fluids) and the rate of reporting those injuries and exposures. The association of occupational injuries with nurses' age, experience and work environment was also determined. Data were obtained from 227 RNs working on 27 adult units in 10 hospitals. Twenty-five nurses (11% of sample) reported an exposure to blood borne disease in the previous three months and 61 (27%) reported a back injury during that three months. What is of greater concern is that few of these injuries were reported. Only 4 of the 25 exposures were reported and only 6 of the 61 back injuries were reported. Nurses indicated that the primary reasons that needlesticks and other exposures occurred were: chaotic conditions on the unit, stress or crisis on the unit, and not following standard precautions. The primary reasons for back injuries were: not enough people to help move patients, increase in total care patients, and improper transfer techniques. Nurses who experienced an occupational injury reported lower job satisfaction and job commitment and reported that equipment and supplies were inadequate. Nurses who had experienced an injury were older than those who had not. Unit workload was not related to occupational injury rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital Nurses' Occupational Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospital Nurses' Occupational Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blegen, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4200 East 9th Avenue, C288-04, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303.315.4237</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mary.Blegen@UCHSC.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses' occupational safety, particularly back injuries and exposure to body fluids and blood borne pathogens, is of major concern. In the last 15 years, with the burgeoning problem of blood borne disease, there has been a specific emphasis on Standard precautions and the immediate reporting of needlesticks and other exposures to body fluids. Non-compliance with the precautions is a major issue as is the reporting of exposures. Research studies have focused on compliance with Standard Precautions; but, few studies have examined the reporting rate. The purpose of this study was to describe the rate of occupational injuries (back injuries and exposure to body fluids) and the rate of reporting those injuries and exposures. The association of occupational injuries with nurses' age, experience and work environment was also determined. Data were obtained from 227 RNs working on 27 adult units in 10 hospitals. Twenty-five nurses (11% of sample) reported an exposure to blood borne disease in the previous three months and 61 (27%) reported a back injury during that three months. What is of greater concern is that few of these injuries were reported. Only 4 of the 25 exposures were reported and only 6 of the 61 back injuries were reported. Nurses indicated that the primary reasons that needlesticks and other exposures occurred were: chaotic conditions on the unit, stress or crisis on the unit, and not following standard precautions. The primary reasons for back injuries were: not enough people to help move patients, increase in total care patients, and improper transfer techniques. Nurses who experienced an occupational injury reported lower job satisfaction and job commitment and reported that equipment and supplies were inadequate. Nurses who had experienced an injury were older than those who had not. Unit workload was not related to occupational injury rates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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