2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160587
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interactive Voice Response Technology for Smoking Cessation Relapse Prevention
Abstract:
Interactive Voice Response Technology for Smoking Cessation Relapse Prevention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McDaniel, Anna, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 483, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.8095
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot test of an interactive voice response (IVR) system for preventing relapse in individuals who had completed a smoking cessation program affiliated with an inner-city public hospital. Conceptual Framework: The framework for this study was Marlatt and Gordon's Relapse Prevention Model. Sample: A convenience sample of 24 participants in a smoking cessation educational program was recruited for this study. Methods: A computerized telephone system prospectively called participants to monitor progress and provide brief educational/motivational messages about quitting smoking for six weeks after completing the smoking cessation classes. The IVR system used a prerecorded question set to collect data from patients via a telephone keypad. An algorithm controlled the sequencing of the data collection and provided feedback based on patient input. Follow-up data about satisfaction and usability of the system were obtained by telephone interview at the end of the trial period. Results: Of 32 eligible patients, 24 agreed to participate in the feasibility study (75% recruitment rate). Overall, 73% (140/192) of calls placed by the IVR system were completed. Over 75% of participants agreed that the use of the computerized calling system to help people quit smoking was a "good idea". Fifteen participants (68%) found the system "somewhat" or "very" helpful in quitting smoking. Satisfaction with the system was high: mean satisfaction score of 32.5 out of a possible 40. Fourteen participants (58%) reported abstinence from smoking at follow-up. There was a significant positive association between the number of calls received by the IVR and smoking abstinence. Conclusions: Preliminary results of this pilot study suggest that IVR technology is a useful and acceptable method for relapse prevention with the potential for significant impact at a relatively low cost.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteractive Voice Response Technology for Smoking Cessation Relapse Preventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160587-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interactive Voice Response Technology for Smoking Cessation Relapse Prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDaniel, Anna, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 483, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.8095</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amcdanie@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot test of an interactive voice response (IVR) system for preventing relapse in individuals who had completed a smoking cessation program affiliated with an inner-city public hospital. Conceptual Framework: The framework for this study was Marlatt and Gordon's Relapse Prevention Model. Sample: A convenience sample of 24 participants in a smoking cessation educational program was recruited for this study. Methods: A computerized telephone system prospectively called participants to monitor progress and provide brief educational/motivational messages about quitting smoking for six weeks after completing the smoking cessation classes. The IVR system used a prerecorded question set to collect data from patients via a telephone keypad. An algorithm controlled the sequencing of the data collection and provided feedback based on patient input. Follow-up data about satisfaction and usability of the system were obtained by telephone interview at the end of the trial period. Results: Of 32 eligible patients, 24 agreed to participate in the feasibility study (75% recruitment rate). Overall, 73% (140/192) of calls placed by the IVR system were completed. Over 75% of participants agreed that the use of the computerized calling system to help people quit smoking was a &quot;good idea&quot;. Fifteen participants (68%) found the system &quot;somewhat&quot; or &quot;very&quot; helpful in quitting smoking. Satisfaction with the system was high: mean satisfaction score of 32.5 out of a possible 40. Fourteen participants (58%) reported abstinence from smoking at follow-up. There was a significant positive association between the number of calls received by the IVR and smoking abstinence. Conclusions: Preliminary results of this pilot study suggest that IVR technology is a useful and acceptable method for relapse prevention with the potential for significant impact at a relatively low cost.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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